Observation 28521: Cortinarius violaceus (L.) Gray
When: 2009-11-07
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Found under tan oak, D. fir, and redwood.

Given to Paul, mycology grad student at SFSU, and I believe he was going to save this for part of his studies at the herbarium there.

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David just collected another of these at SP yesterday.
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2016-11-13 13:51:42 PST (-0800)

If he took a field photo, I’ll ask him to put it up here. Otherwise, I will shoot the specimen that he brought back with him, and put it up here myself.

It will be at the BAMS meeting Thursday night.

two “problems” here with our disputable mushroom collections re: range and ID…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-11-20 07:36:34 PST (-0800)

mushrooms, like all organisms, move around. gone today, here tomorrow. and vice versa. And of course, the better we get at identification, and the more trained people looking hard at what we find, the more discrepencies we will see with the “common wisdom.”

that’s progress. and evolution.

Could be…
By: Dimitar Bojantchev (dimitar)
2009-11-20 07:23:37 PST (-0800)

It could very well be even in the C. violaceus (rather simple) group.

The more I look at the Western material, the more I realize that we too are dealing with species complexes. Just when I thought that I had the Cortinarius calyptratus Smith concept fixed, a misfortunate event occurred where I collected in Oregon and saw a few things, which are similar, but now quite the same… So, now I am back to the drawing board. We do have a rather rich flora of calyptrate Cortinarii, which do come out only after some serious collecting has taken place..

D.
Just to complicate things…
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2009-11-20 07:14:49 PST (-0800)

This is no doubt a species in the violaceus group.
In Europe, there are two forms that now are separated as two different species:
one with conifers, Cortinarius hercynicus (often darker, large and sturdy).
one with hardwoods, Cortinarius violaceus (the ones I’ve seen have been smaller and a bit paler, under aspen). There’s a little difference in spore shape and ornamentation too.

I wouldn’t be surprised if this also ends up as a separate species – a perfect project.

Um, off the side of the road…
By: Douglas Smith (douglas)
2009-11-20 06:51:57 PST (-0800)

Well, it seemed to be hiding off the side of the road, just down from the camp grounds.

Not seen in years
By: Darvin DeShazer (darv)
2009-11-20 06:31:43 PST (-0800)

I haven’t seen this species at Salt Point in all the years (23) of collecting there. I wonder were it has been hiding…

Created: 2009-11-20 04:15:57 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2009-11-20 04:15:57 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 84 times, last viewed: 2016-11-13 21:52:06 PST (-0800)
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