Observation 29127: Chrysopidae
When: 2009-11-20
No herbarium specimen

Notes: The substrate here is a pine needle but I do have other shots of them that are on a small branch of an unknown plant.

Species Lists

Images

66887
66888
66889
67399
I know these are not great pics but I had a heck of a time just trying to get anything in focus and not too over exposed with what I have.
67400
I know these are not great pics but I had a heck of a time just trying to get anything in focus and not too over exposed with what I have.
67403
Okay, I found the subject in pic #67399 and I broke it off and brought it inside the house to have a little more controlled environment. These are “the best” with my camera that I can do. I hope it helps a little more but I know that they are still not quite where you and I would want t...
67404
Okay, I found the subject in pic #67399 and I broke it off and brought it inside the house to have a little more controlled environment. These are “the best” with my camera that I can do. I hope it helps a little more but I know that they are still not quite where you and I would want t...

Proposed Names

-89% (5)
Recognized by sight: Photos are not clear enough to tell what the fertile surface looks like.
-89% (5)
Recognized by sight
-89% (5)
Recognized by sight
21% (8)
Eye3
Recognized by sight: Based on user comment below, I’ve also seen these on grapevines.
30% (2)
Recognized by sight
40% (4)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Green lacewing eggs
30% (2)
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
/agree
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2013-01-30 13:52:24 PST (-0800)

There are many, many non-fungal uses of Latin on the site. I’ve attempted to create a means for segregating them through the use of the Non-Fungal species list. I echo Byrain’s sentiments about specificity being helpful in finding out more any given non-fungal entry, Observation 49723 being among the best examples.

For those that do don the moniker of Non-fungal and nothing more, the seemingly agreed-upon spelling is the hyphenated version, hence the deprecation of Nonfungal (which isn’t a word).

Chrysopidae
By: Byrain
2013-01-30 09:17:27 PST (-0800)

Is more correct then non-fungal, if you dont want to use an insect family, Insecta is more correct too. Though, I don’t really care what name is used, I proposed Chrysopidae because I think that is what this probably is and now others can see the possibility and look it up themselves too. :)

Personally, I’m under the understanding that MO is not only for fungal related things, but also things that can be mistaken as fungal.

Non Fungal
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2013-01-30 09:00:54 PST (-0800)

seems to me to be a better name rather than add an insect family to our fungi database

Hey, at least they aren’t fungus-gnat eggs!
By: Eric Geller (sagacious)
2009-12-05 19:56:11 PST (-0800)

No worries mates, just lending a hand.

.
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2009-12-05 13:27:29 PST (-0800)

/removes foot from mouth

i guess wanting something to be a mushroom, no matter how much, will never make it a mushroom. bravo, Eric.

When one user commented on an animal possibility
By: Chaz (tripper1445)
2009-12-05 12:12:18 PST (-0800)

I wasn’t considering insects. There you go!

Photo shows lacewing insect eggs (order Neuroptera)
By: Eric Geller (sagacious)
2009-12-04 18:09:20 PST (-0800)

The photos are of lacewing insect eggs. The eggs are generally laid on the underside of a thin twig, and are secured to the twig with a long, translucent stalk— the better to avoid predation by ants and other predatory insects.

The reason the ‘heads’ are crumpled is because the eggs have hatched and the lacewing nymphs have departed, leaving only the crumpled egg-case and its supporting stalk.

I hope this commentary is welcome and helpful, and although the photos are not of a fungus, they are still quite good considering the subject is translucent and very small. Comparative photos of lacewing egg capsules can readily be found on the internet to confirm this identification.

These new pictures…
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2009-12-01 13:05:42 PST (-0800)

… convey marasmioid characteristics to a T. Widely spaced gills; remarkably ephemeral fruit bodies; thin, slender, fragile stipes.

not fungal??
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2009-12-01 12:06:31 PST (-0800)

I wouldn’t go as far to say these are not macrofungi, perhaps a slime mold at the very least. I see a cap and stem, in focus or not. To what kind of animal creation are you referring?

Furthermore, we know that there are a whole host of tiny agarics that religiously choose fallen pine needles, dead leaves, blades of rotting grass and twigs as substrate. They are prolific throughout the Amazon which, coincidentally, has a great deal in common with the Louisiana bayou as far as habitats go.

Consider these:

http://www.mycokey.com/Ecuador/album/slides/TL-11455.html
http://www.mycokey.com/Ecuador/album/slides/TL-9100.html
http://www.mycokey.com/Ecuador/album/slides/TL-11384.html

Interesting!
By: Chaz (tripper1445)
2009-12-01 10:52:24 PST (-0800)

What kind of animal could cause this effect? There are a few that live back here but not too diverse. We have field mice, moles, rabbits, squirrels, opossum, occasionally deer, and the mysterious wild boar (which I’ve never seen) and there may be others I’m unaware of or can’t think of at this moment (maybe an armadillo).

I just now thought of snakes. I have found garter snakes, black snakes and yellow speckled black snakes.

either non-fungal or a Typhula
By: else
2009-12-01 10:46:10 PST (-0800)

the fact that the ‘heads’ appear to be crumpled make me think that this might be made by an animal.
Otherwise i totally agree with Darv that it is a Typhula species. Definitely not Macrotyphula.

The best I can do!
By: Chaz (tripper1445)
2009-12-01 09:06:56 PST (-0800)

I just have a point and shoot camera with a macro setting and I have no control over depth of field and/or a tighter focus. I took shot after shot trying to get the best and this is what I have to offer. Maybe Santa will be good to me this year.

.
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2009-12-01 03:05:48 PST (-0800)

All Macrotyphula I’ve come across have been long, slender, and distinctly non-stipitate/non-capitate. These appear to have the morphology of agarics, but better photos are needed. Perhaps Marasmiellus sp.?

Created: 2009-11-29 19:09:40 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2013-01-30 18:14:59 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 331 times, last viewed: 2016-11-22 06:56:02 PST (-0800)
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