Observation 30816: Lentinellus cochleatus (Pers.) P. Karst.
When: 2009-12-22
Collection location: Georgia, USA [Click for map]
No herbarium specimen

Notes: I have never collected this species of Lentinellus before.

I think it is Lentinellus omphalodes because of the lamellae having serrated edges, as well as its peppery taste and smooth pileus.

The one thing I am curious about though are the fused stipes on the specimens in the first pic, I thought this was common for Lentinellus cochleatus and not other species in the genus?

Proposed Names

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Thanks CureCat
By: Timoteo (Timoteo)
2010-01-02 00:55:10 CST (-0500)

The field guide I am using at the moment does not contain the updated species names so things can become confusing.

The guide said that Lentinellus omphalodes is the only Lentinellus species with a fused stipe, guess they were wrong. Its hard to find a good field guide it seems like!

The field guide I am using is North American Mushrooms by Orson K. Miller and Hope Miller, it has its positive and negative sides but is an OK field guide.

By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2009-12-22 20:00:20 CST (-0500)

Huh, very cool mushrooms!

Okay, so L. cochleatus also have serrate lamelle…

And the fused stipes also does not seem exclusive to L. cochleatus.

And they both have longitudinally grooved stipes…

The orange/yellow colour (granted, flash was used), smaller cap to stem ratio [L. micheneri (=L. omphalodes) seems to have a larger cap, and smaller stipe] and more rubbery texture of these mushrooms looks more like L. cochleatus, but I am not sure.

P.s. I think the current name for L. omphalodes is L. micheneri.

Created: 2009-12-22 19:11:31 CST (-0500)
Last modified: 2009-12-22 19:11:31 CST (-0500)
Viewed: 74 times, last viewed: 2016-10-21 21:27:26 CDT (-0400)
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