Observation 31559: Cortinarius croceus (Schaeff.) Gray
When: 2010-01-05
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: The spores on these ( approx. 6.8-8.2 X 4.5-5.7 microns) do fall into the right range for C. cinnamomeus or C. croceus but the coloring doesn’t quite seem to fit nor the habitat. They were growing in a grassy area with only a live Oak and a Madrone nearby.
At the suggestion of Irene and Dimitar, I’ve changed the name to Cortinarius croceus to reflect what these more closely resemble.

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These sure didn’t appear to be the same
By: Ron Pastorino (Ronpast)
2010-01-08 13:35:25 CST (-0500)
as MO #31560, but I changed the name to reflect at least the closer apparent relationship. While the spores looked very similar between the two groups, they had dissimilar habitat, cap shape and colors and they even dried up quite unlike each other.
Closer to croceus..
By: Dimitar Bojantchev (dimitar)
2010-01-07 14:25:16 CST (-0500)

This also I have been taught to interpret as C. croceus for the reasons Irene mentioned. I have wondered countless times whether the olive-mustard fibrillose capped and chestnut-brown glabrous capped species are the same and I feel that more study is needed. But for now I’d call this C. croceus s.l.

D.

The gills
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2010-01-07 03:32:43 CST (-0500)

seem too pale yellowish for cinnamomeus. This looks to me like something in the croceus group.
Young specimen with gills without spores are needed to decide their colour – or you can cut off a part of the cap and look closely at the colour in the gills. It could be worth mentioning that aging caps tend to become more or less red in most Dermocybe species.

Created: 2010-01-06 19:16:07 CST (-0500)
Last modified: 2010-01-06 19:16:07 CST (-0500)
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