Observation 32700: Daedaleopsis septentrionalis (P. Karst.) Niemelä
When: 2010-01-25
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Found this on dead birch. Very similar to Gloeophyllum saepiarium but not growing on conifers. This is on Birch. The cap is tan with zones of brown the gills and flesh dark brown. darkens in KOH

Images

75483
75484
75485
75486
75493
more images of the gills
75494
more images of the gills
75575
This is a comparison of the two species. On the right is Lenzites betulina with the lighter color and the lighter gills On the left is the specimen in the observation. Both are of the same freshness. These where collected at the same time but at about a mile apart. Tomorrow hopefully I will have so...
75576
This is a comparison of the two species. On the right is Lenzites betulina with the lighter color and the lighter gills On the left is the specimen in the observation. Both are of the same freshness. These where collected at the same time but at about a mile apart. Tomorrow hopefully I will have so...
75577
KOH reaction over 30 min
75578
KOH reaction on Lenzites betulina over 30 min.
75736
spore shot hard to get some spore out of this but found a few also there is the basidia too
75737
spore shot hard to get some spore out of this but found a few also there is the basidia too

Proposed Names

-30% (2)
Recognized by sight: found on dead birch
0% (2)
Recognized by sight: I’m taking into consideration that these have been there since autumn.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
It works
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2010-01-27 06:14:15 PST (-0800)

My floating technique always works. and yes the dendrohyphidia are branched.

Congratulations!
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2010-01-26 23:43:45 PST (-0800)

I know how hard it can be to find spores in the microscope from an old polypore.. Without knowing the size, at least the shape of spores and basidia is a good match. Did you notice any branched dendrohyphidia on the gills?

I have pictures
By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2010-01-26 09:53:08 PST (-0800)

of the same Daedaleopsis septentrionalis from the NEMF foray that Dianna Smith has on PBase. I will post it when I get home next week…
This one looks like the common southern form (species?)that we saw lots of at the NAMA foray in Louisiana, I think I photographed it… but these pictures are also at home.

I will try and get some spore shots
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2010-01-26 07:58:52 PST (-0800)

I have 6 specimens from this birch log. some are still tissue like texture and not cardboard so ill try and float some spores up. I have a method i came up with (at least I think I did) using a zinc sulfate solution. I’m able to float spores of fungi that are difficult to get a spore print on or obtain spores.

Interesting comparison
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2010-01-25 23:42:48 PST (-0800)

Daedaleopsis septentrionalis is one I haven’t seen often, and apparently rare in North America too. If you’re not aware of its existence, it’s easily confused with Lenzites betulina.
The main difference in most descriptions is that the “gills” are pale in Lenzites and some shade of brown i Daedaleopsis. What I have noticed from many pictures, is that the hymenium of a young Daedaleopsis is often bruising brownish, something I have never experienced with Lenzites.

If it’s possible to find spores in this (could be too old), they are clearly longer in Daedaleopsis septentrionalis (7-10 µm and slightly curved).

They seem fresh
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2010-01-25 19:05:38 PST (-0800)

There are some not so fresh but those are bit brittle like cardboard. I put a comparison of the two species up. Thes are both at he same freshnes. I have sen L betulina as a very old fruiting body and I have yet to see the gills type surface turn this dark. This also turns black in KOH where as Lenzites betulinea does not. but turns a slight brown.

Fresh?
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2010-01-25 18:47:09 PST (-0800)

Fresh frozen and now thawed seems more likely. What makes you think they just fruited?

There fresh
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2010-01-25 18:35:46 PST (-0800)
These are different
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2010-01-25 18:16:19 PST (-0800)

For the sake of argument lets call them gills even though they are not. The gills are light in those images and more maze like. The gills on these specimens are brown. In image 74593 is some what of a young specimen. The gills are a purple brown and as the fungi ages they become a dark brown.

Good pictures are hard to find
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2010-01-25 10:18:59 PST (-0800)

But here are some young ones:
http://www.toxino.com/...
http://www.pbase.com/comafungi/image/84266188

more pics, unfortunately not showing the “gills”:
http://www.toxino.com/...

Pore surface are very Gill like
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2010-01-25 09:16:03 PST (-0800)

I thought Daedaleopsis has more of a maze like pore surface. The pore surface here is gilled like Lenzites betulina but very dark.

Created: 2010-01-25 07:54:12 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2016-08-20 13:01:06 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 575 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 16:19:30 PDT (-0700)
Show Log