Observation 44100: Imshaugia aleurites (Ach.) S.F. Meyer
When: 2010-04-10
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Location: 35°12’48.33"N, 85°54’14.26"W, el. 524 m. Piney Point Trail.

Substrate: Growing on the bark of a pine tree, Pinus.

Habitat: Low, open, pine-oak woodland on thin, sandy soil over sandstone at the edge of the western escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau.

Chemistry:
medulla C-, K+ bright, deep yellow (immediately), KC+ yellow turns orangy-brown (slowly), Pd+ intense yellow (immediately)

References:
Harris and Ladd, 2005, Preliminary Draft: Ozark Lichens, pp.133-134. Description of the pycnidia.
Sharnoff’s Imshaugia aleurites gallery
CNALH images, description, and locality map, and a larger, interactive locality map.

Voucher specimen:
United States, Tennessee, Franklin County, Sewanee, Piney Point Trail. 10 Apr 2010. Chris Parrish 0082, det. James C. Lendemer (NY).

Common name: salted starburst lichen

Species Lists

Images

82836
82832
82833
82834
82835
82953
thallus, 7.1x
82954
long, cylindrical isidia, often with brownish tips, 12.5x
82955
thallus and isidia, 25x
82956
thallus and isidia, 32x
82957
dense patch of isidia, 50x
82958
isidia, 80x
82959
isidia, 80x
82960
black pycnidia on isidia, 60x
82961
black pycnidia on isidia, 115x
82962
broken isidia showing algae inside, 115x
82963
broken isidia showing algae inside, 115x
82964
lobes, 32x
82965
lobes, 32x
82966
rhizines, 32x
82967
rhizines, 40x
82968
rhizines, 63x
82969
lower cortex, 32x
82970
lower cortex, 40x

Proposed Names

28% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: Brodo, Sharnoff, and Sharnoff, 2001, pp.361-362; Hinds and Hinds, 2005, pp.279-281.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
pycnidia on isidia!
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2010-04-11 20:17:35 PDT (-0700)

Isn’t that the damnedest thing… if you’re into that sort of thing, at least. Sort of reminiscent of the cetrarioids, but theirs are merely stalked, not on isidia. What a bizarre thing — if you’re going to invest in pycnidia why would you design them to fall off?? Maybe that’s part of a crafty compound-dispersal strategy…

Piney Point
By: Chris Parrish (kitparrish)
2010-04-11 10:18:47 PDT (-0700)

There is a small patch of gnarly pines on this point, in our local sea of Quercus, Carya, Acer, Liriodendron eastern deciduous forest … perhaps because of the very thin sandy soil perched on sandstone at this site at the edge of a canyon. I have walked this trail several times, but this is the first time my lichen antennae detected Imshaugia aleurites.

got it!
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2010-04-11 10:01:47 PDT (-0700)

Cool, see you found it! Nice, yeah, I almost always find it on pine bark, too.

Created: 2010-04-11 09:54:18 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2010-06-09 00:10:17 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 331 times, last viewed: 2016-10-24 01:31:44 PDT (-0700)
Show Log