Observation 45388: Laetiporus Murrill
When: 2010-05-14
No herbarium specimen

Notes: It was so dark in the area that I found this fungi that I was forced to remove it and carry it back to the edge of the forest to get some respectable images. It too was a brialliant colour in the bush but lost some of this when I brought it out into the daylight. This specimen was about 9inches (22cm) across. It had no aroma and was dry.

Images

85690
Copyright © 2010 Ian Dodd Kundabung NSW Australia
85691
Copyright © 2010 Ian Dodd Kundabung NSW Australia
85692
Copyright © 2010 Ian Dodd Kundabung NSW Australia
This image is not as sharp, but the colours are more accurate.

Proposed Names

28% (1)
Recognized by sight
85% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: Naming suggested by Irenea

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Irene

Thanks (as usual) for the comment. Have missed your help.kk

Laetiporus, I presume
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2010-05-14 16:05:37 EDT (-0400)

I got a bit confused when I found that L. cincinnatus (the white-pored form) has been synonymized with L. sulphureus.
And then I found that a phylogeographic study
http://www.mycologia.org/cgi/content/abstract/09-044v1
has identified 12 different clades (I don’t know where the australian species belong, if it’s even among them), and it raised the question which one is the true sulphureus..

Anyway, I’d like to see this in the Laetiporus sulphureus group.

Noah

This was growing on dead wood, An old log. Noah, if you look at the base of the second image full resolution you can still see some of the timber it was attached to. Chow, kk

Laetiporus?
By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2010-05-14 05:21:23 EDT (-0400)

what was this growing on?

Created: 2010-05-14 04:27:07 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2010-05-15 18:07:32 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 70 times, last viewed: 2016-10-25 01:35:35 EDT (-0400)
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