Observation 47129: Cantharocybe gruberi (A.H. Sm.) H.E. Bigelow & A.H. Sm.
When: 2010-06-18
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Under conifer.

Proposed Names

94% (3)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Christian suggested this name to me. Microscopically and macroscopically a fine match.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Haha
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-28 15:37:08 PDT (-0700)

So it is… Frankly, I didn’t even notice. I guess it must have gone under the radar of any peer reviewers as well.

Counting taxa
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-06-28 15:33:46 PDT (-0700)

“The states of four taxa, Neohygrophorus angelesianus, Clitocybe subvelosa, Lyophyllum sp., Cantharocybe gruberi and Boletinellus merulioides, were coded ambiguously due to uncertainty over their EM status.”

Er, that’s five taxa. :)

By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-28 15:10:52 PDT (-0700)

There are a lot of saprotrophic fungi that grow terrestrially.

Just because Cantharocybe and Cantharellus have similar names does not mean that they are related…

In Major clades of Agaricales: a multilocus phylogenetic overview, Methany et al., Mycologia, 98(6), 2006, pp. 982-995, it says:
“The states of four taxa, Neohygrophorus angelesianus, Clitocybe subvelosa, Lyophyllum sp., Cantharocybe gruberi and Boletinellus merulioides, were coded ambiguously due to uncertainty over their EM status.”

In the resulting cladogram, C. gruberi fell into the Pleurotaceae (no EM species listed), next to the Amanitaceae (3 EM species listed [all Amanita], 1 non-EM [not an Amanita]), which both groups fall into the Pluteoid Clade of the map, containing a few other non-EM groups.

So I guess I would say C. gruberi is not EcM at all.

If terrestrial and not associated with wood
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2010-06-28 15:04:05 PDT (-0700)

then likely mycorrhizal in my experience. All Cantharellus that I know of are mycorrhizal, as well as Laccaria. Food supply for larger macrofungi typically derive from sharing carbohydrates produced for symbiont.

.
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-28 13:47:06 PDT (-0700)

Debbie, I did see your observation as well as Doug’s.

In your observation you have a note with the photo of some of the weird cystidia:
“too young for spores, but did find this weird structure…”
I had a hell of a time finding spores with this one, so maybe yours were not too young. Most sections I tried to look at I couldn’t see any spores, but finally I found a method of sectioning which kept the spores in place.. Kind of difficult to explain.

Tuberale, I do not know if it is mycorrhizal. It used to be in Clitocybe (saprobe) and Laccaria (EcM).

Never heard of it before.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2010-06-28 11:40:43 PDT (-0700)

That’s a completely new genus and species to me. I’ve never even heard Cantharocybe before. OTOH, I’ve never seen this fungus before, either, so it sort of fits. Presumably mycorrhizal?

good find!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2010-06-28 10:26:10 PDT (-0700)

PiPi is apparently a hotbed of these curious fungi. See prior posting here:

http://mushroomobserver.org/21104?q=14Ft

.
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-28 09:46:51 PDT (-0700)

Christian Schwarz suggested Cantharocybe gruberi- hit the nail on the head! With these huge, irregular spores, and I guess I forgot to mention the cystidia- they are abundant and very strangely and inconsistently shaped- this is a good match for that species.

spores
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-26 02:21:48 PDT (-0700)

Rough measurements of the spores are approximately 10-14µ x 3-5µ .
They are inamyloid.
All of the spores measured at 100x are warted.
Alan is going to upload photos soon.

yes
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-25 01:47:47 PDT (-0700)

It will help if we can narrow it down to genus, any way…
Pictures and spore measurements tomorrow.

CureCat
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2010-06-25 01:21:29 PDT (-0700)

Spore size? I think that might help a little.

weird spores
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-06-24 23:04:36 PDT (-0700)

This thing has weird spores. Can’t determine the colour, but they seem to be light in colour. No reaction in KOH. They are narrowly and evenly cylindrical, and very warted! Though a few seem to be unornamented and thick walled, but otherwise the same shape and size.

I have nothing… Anyone else??

Terrestrial
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2010-06-20 15:20:41 PDT (-0700)

It was growing on the ground.

Terrestrial then?
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2010-06-20 15:09:18 PDT (-0700)

Not growing from wood or buried wood? Looks similar to Lentinus tigrinus, but I don’t see any notching on the gills. Stipe looks like it might have been growing on wood.

Created: 2010-06-19 15:11:32 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2010-07-28 07:36:30 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 298 times, last viewed: 2016-08-25 18:42:08 PDT (-0700)
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