Observation 48933: Chlorophyllum molybdites (G. Mey.: Fr.) Massee
When: 2010-07-22
Who: budr
No herbarium specimen

Notes: What is this? Is it edible? The biggest one is 5" in diameter.

[admin – Sat Aug 14 02:03:31 +0000 2010]: Changed location name from ‘Near Charlotte, nc. In yard out in the open sun.’ to ‘near Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

Proposed Names

87% (4)
Recognized by sight: Large in lawns, scaly cap, greenish gills.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


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but it is prior knowledge of their toxicity that colors your attitude towards them, Weilliii…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2010-07-22 14:45:28 EDT (-0400)

without that knowledge beforehand, they do indeed appear delicious looking to many, hence their role in the vast majority of mushroom poisonings across North America.

Plus, so convenient growing in one’s own lawn! ;)

I am not advocating eating them, just acknowledging that they can indeed be tempting to the fungignorant. Which is where a site like MO can come in very handy to those first starting out.

By: AmatoxinApocalypse (AmatoxinApocalypse)
2010-07-22 14:21:05 EDT (-0400)

When young the “green gills” mushroom looks like it would be a great edible, smells good to. But once those gills turn green I just imagine my stomach and face turning that color :(

tempting though, aren’t they?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2010-07-22 12:03:49 EDT (-0400)

which is why this mushroom is the number one cause of non-fatal mushroom poisoining in the US. Take a spore print (molybdites has green spores at maturity) to tell the difference between C. molybdites and Chlorophyllum rachodes, an edible lookalike.

By: AmatoxinApocalypse (AmatoxinApocalypse)
2010-07-22 11:36:31 EDT (-0400)

This mushroom is poisonous, it causes sever gastric disturbances.

Created: 2010-07-22 10:19:19 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2011-05-23 23:06:01 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 110 times, last viewed: 2016-10-26 14:59:03 EDT (-0400)
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