Observation 49372: Panus Fr.
When: 2010-07-24
No herbarium specimen

Notes: I have no idea what this clitocyboid species is; I am pretty sure it is not a Clitocybe, but that is all.
Added in response to CureCat: Sorry that I misidentified where it is from before (I had forgotten); I changed it now. It was on the indentification table at our Wisconsin Mycological Society foray. I saw it in Hiles, and it was probably picked in Forest County, but people went to several sites. As you figured out, it was not from the grass that I took the picture on, and you can see some very decayed wood in the photo taken from the top. I agree that it might be some sort of a Panus species.

[admin – Sat Aug 14 02:02:25 +0000 2010]: Changed location name from ‘Little Pine Motel, Hiles, Forest County, Wisconsin, USA’ to ‘Little Pine Motel, Hiles, Wisconsin, USA

Proposed Names

32% (7)
Recognized by sight
-21% (4)
Recognized by sight
-8% (5)
Recognized by sight
18% (7)
Recognized by sight: so…we’re all agreed then. same shroom, new(ish) name.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


Add Comment
I was thinking…
By: Douglas Smith (douglas)
2010-07-31 07:33:06 CEST (+0200)

It was something like Cantharellula, I think I can see gills forking towards the margin in some cases there.

That also happens in Lentinus I think? Which would be on wood… But usually have thinner gills.

Just some other ideas to go with here…

I’m not sold on it yet…
By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2010-07-31 06:05:28 CEST (+0200)

I should say it looks sorta like it… the stipe is wrong.

By: Darvin DeShazer (darv)
2010-07-31 06:02:02 CEST (+0200)

That’s interesting Noah. Nothing about this one looks like the Western Panus conchatus.

By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2010-07-31 05:55:35 CEST (+0200)

yep, the western one are big and stocky with really crowed gills that fork a lot, can be dark purple when young and a lot more velvety. Our eastern one is thinner fleshed, gills are wider spaced and don’t fork as much and usually is only tinged purple when young.

But this looks like the mushroom I know as Panus conchatus

Debbie, 1838 is a “new(ish) name”?

Um… no.
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2010-07-31 04:51:17 CEST (+0200)

That´s what I´m saying. If this was in Santa Cruz, I would NOT call it P. conchatus. Panus maybe, but not conchatus.

Do we all agree?
By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2010-07-31 04:29:54 CEST (+0200)

is it the same shroom as the western thing going by this name?

Probably not P. conchatus
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2010-07-31 04:29:05 CEST (+0200)

In that species, the gills are the LAST thing to lose their purple, in this one, the gills are much less purple than the cap (which, itself is more dull ruddy than actually purplish)…

Can’t keep up with the names
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2010-07-31 04:25:44 CEST (+0200)

and the site accepted it.

By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-07-31 03:03:07 CEST (+0200)

Why are you proposing the old synonym for P. conchatus?

By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2010-07-30 21:23:00 CEST (+0200)

Was this growing out of wood? It doesn’t look like it came from the grass.

Created: 2010-07-30 19:03:22 CEST (+0200)
Last modified: 2011-09-30 23:20:52 CEST (+0200)
Viewed: 187 times, last viewed: 2016-10-24 16:28:20 CEST (+0200)
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