Observation 51396: Amanita sect. Validae (Fr.) Singer
When: 2010-08-22
No herbarium specimen

Proposed Names

51% (3)
Eye3
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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spore print…
By: Alok Mahendroo (alok)
2010-08-27 08:44:24 CDT (-0400)

Sorry Rod could not get spore print out of this one.. (kind of fell apart before I reached back).. but will try to look for it again this weekend…

I agree that section vaginata is unlikely…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2010-08-26 20:21:21 CDT (-0400)

esp. if there are no cap striations and an annulus is present.

but weird vaginate amanitas like protecta sometimes do show a swollen base, as well as having crumbling bits of UV tissue at the top of the volva, much like Alok’s depicted here. there are several examples of protecta that show these characters on MO.

still, it is far more likely to be one of the validae.

I think that the Vaginatae are not in consideration this time.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2010-08-26 20:01:10 CDT (-0400)

There is a really substantial bulb at the stipe base in Alok’s specimen, and that is not a character that is present in section Vaginatae because of the mode of development in that section (i.e., basidiome developing approximately centrally in the primoridum and the stem totally elongating).

Very best,

Rod

did it have a partial veil, or no veil and a striate margin?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2010-08-26 18:57:03 CDT (-0400)

then it could be one of the oddball vaginate amanitas, like our North American Amanita protecta.

My money’s on one of the validae, tho.

In fact Alok, I just found a melted fruit body in Alaska that looks strikingly like yours, altho the warts weren’t quite so gray. That one was Amanita franchetii sensu Thiers (NOT the same as the European A. franchetii). Not saying that franchetii is what you have, but it could be a relative.

Not familiar to me…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2010-08-26 17:15:52 CDT (-0400)

I don’t see any strong indication that the pictured species belongs in section Amanita although I do think that it belongs in the genus.

Alok do you have an iodine solution that could be used to test a small pile of spores from a spore deposit for the amyloid reaction? You will need a bit of glass or ceramic that will not react with iodine itself (paper and wood will react). If you can scrape part of a spore deposit onto a piece of glass or glazed pottery (clear glass or a white dish would be best so that you can clearly see other colors against the background), then put a small drop of iodine solution on the spores, Amanita spores will either turn dark (the amyloid reaction) or will appear to be the same color as the iodine solution (no reaction, in which case the spores are said to be “inamyloid”). If the spores are amyloid in an Amanita, then the amanita in question is in the subgenus Lepidella. If there is no reaction, inamyloid spores determine that the species in question is in subgenus Amanita. This one test will reduce the possible number of species to be checked by approximately 50%.

Very best,

ROd

Not familiar to me…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2010-08-26 17:15:49 CDT (-0400)

I don’t see any strong indication that the pictured species belongs in section Amanita although I do think that it belongs in the genus.

Alok do you have an iodine solution that could be used to test a small pile of spores from a spore deposit for the amyloid reaction? You will need a bit of glass or ceramic that will not react with iodine itself (paper and wood will react). If you can scrape part of a spore deposit onto a piece of glass or glazed pottery (clear glass or a white dish would be best to that you can clearly see other colors against the background), then put a small drop of iodine solution on the spores, Amanita spores will either turn dark (the amyloid reaction) or will appear to be the same color as the iodine solution (no reaction, in which case the spores are said to be “inamyloid.”) If the spores are amyloid in an Amanita, then the amanita in question is in the subgenus Lepidella. If there is no reaction, inamyloid spores determine that the species in question is in subgenus Amanita. This one test will reduce the possible number of species to be checked by approximately 50%.

Very best,

ROd

Created: 2010-08-26 13:20:30 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2010-08-26 19:15:59 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 77 times, last viewed: 2016-10-28 00:17:46 CDT (-0400)
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