Observation 53324: Hygrocybe subminutula Murrill
When: 2010-09-19
(45.801939° -77.135546° )
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: These were scattered in fair numbers in a small area of Zone 45 (mixed w/ aspen). They were quite striking with their bright lemon-yellow caps and bright orange to scarlet stipes, despite their quite small size (up to 1.2cm high or so).

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By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2015-12-27 00:07:01 EET (+0200)
Paul, you really captured
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2015-12-24 21:17:11 EET (+0200)

the colors perfectly. Fantastic photo!

By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2013-09-27 00:37:05 EEST (+0300)

…the specimens that I distinctly recall sending somewhere? Or is that where the ID to species came from?

gorgeous indeed.
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2010-09-22 13:35:54 EEST (+0300)
They’re dry!
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-09-21 10:15:00 EEST (+0300)

I thought about it for a while. Windowsills would be a problem because the household has cats. Inside and the cats will mess with them. Outside and the wind could take them (they’re very small).

So ultimately I decided on sticking them in the bathroom overnight on top of the radiator with the heat in that one room turned on, and way up. I took the wax-paper roll in there, unrolled it — and found the specimens had already dried out nicely while in the cupboard.

Anticlimax there.

So, I have two dried specimens of this, which I haven’t the tools to do anything with. :)

Those suggestions
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-09-21 06:07:48 EEST (+0300)

will have to wait until the sun comes up. The lightbulbs around here are all CFLs; they don’t get very hot. I could put them in front of a radiator and crank up the thermostat but that will probably send my electric bill into the stratosphere.

If you have a
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2010-09-21 05:10:13 EEST (+0300)

south – facing window in your home, preferably an attic window, that gets a lot of sun, then you may be able to dry them on a windowsill. Or maybe you can string them up in a sunny window. Placing onto a grate or a screen in a sunny area, or maybe close to a light bulb, will hasten the dehydration process. But if you want to dry them, they should at least be taken out of the cupboard, unwrapped, and placed in an area that gets good air flow.

I have two.
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-09-21 02:22:11 EEST (+0300)

Wrapped in wax paper in a dry cupboard. They’ve been out of the ground for about four hours. If there’s any special steps I need to take to preserve them beyond that, now is the time to tell me.

By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2010-09-20 20:56:07 EEST (+0300)

You could send them away for examination.

I have unusual chemicals and unusual habit of spending
unusual amounts of time looking at unusual hygrocybes

Probably easily dried
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2010-09-20 20:52:25 EEST (+0300)

for preservation. Those really are distinctive. Can’t recall ever seeing anything similar.

Not viscid
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-09-20 19:56:23 EEST (+0300)

at least so far as I noticed.

I might, in theory, be able to obtain fruitbodies, but transport, storage, and preservation would be difficult and I don’t see what good they’d do sitting around my home anyway as I don’t have a microscope or unusual chemicals.

Was any part of the fruitbody viscid?
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2010-09-20 17:40:22 EEST (+0300)

This would be a very good observation to back up with herbarium specimens. Any chance you can get a hold of a couple fruitbodies?

I just looked at Hesler and Smith’s Hygro monograph, and it looks like we’d need a bit more micro information to proceed with this one. Too bad they didn’t have color photos – this one would’ve been a snap to recognize!

I’m glad you like them.
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-09-20 09:14:24 EEST (+0300)

I thought they were pretty nifty myself.

By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2010-09-20 09:11:00 EEST (+0300)

These are really cool.

Created: 2010-09-20 08:10:05 EEST (+0300)
Last modified: 2015-12-27 20:39:11 EET (+0200)
Viewed: 405 times, last viewed: 2016-10-28 11:48:03 EEST (+0300)
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