Observation 6176: Armillaria nabsnona T.J. Volk & Burds.
When: 1993-07-20

Notes: This is the type specimen of Armillaria nabsnona, growing on Acer macrophylla (bigleaf maple). I collected it in 1993. The specimen is deposited at CFMR in Madison WI.

see http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/feb99.html for more info on this species

Species Lists

Images

10592
These are various views of the type specimen of Armillaria nabsnona Volk & Burdsall
10593
These are various views of the type specimen of Armillaria nabsnona Volk & Burdsall
10594
These are various views of the type specimen of Armillaria nabsnona Volk & Burdsall
10595
These are various views of the type specimen of Armillaria nabsnona Volk & Burdsall

Proposed Names

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
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Comments

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By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2008-01-29 16:03:06 CST (-0500)

“they all have that crunchy/slimy texture and that little bit of metallic taste.”
It’s too bad you don’t write culinary menus! ;)
Seeing as you consider Honeys a good edible and all, haha. I think I cook them long enough that the “slimy” texture goes away.

tastes the same!
By: Tom Volk (TomVolk)
2008-01-29 14:35:25 CST (-0500)

All the Armillaria species I have eaten taste the same to me. they all have that crunchy/slimy texture and that little bit of metallic taste. I think I have only eaten it once.

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By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2008-01-28 00:50:51 CST (-0500)

Yes, i liked the species name based on the story behind it in FOTM. Clever.
Have you eaten them?? Are they as good as other Honey Mushroom species? Any distinct flavour or texture?

the name
By: Tom Volk (TomVolk)
2008-01-27 18:26:13 CST (-0500)

The epithet of this fungus comes from North American Biological Species nine. :) I am easily amused.

Others of the same species look similar, although many are not as striate on the margins, and sometimes the shape is a little more campanulate. The individual fruiting bodies are gregarious but not caespitose and known only from hardwoods, mostly alders and maples. The dried specimens are smooth on the top as far as i remember

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By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2008-01-26 03:28:44 CST (-0500)

The macro distinctions that stand apart from most Armillaria sp. I’ve seen are the thin, long stipe, along with an especially viscid, and red rusty coloured pileus, and striate margin.
Do these traits tend to persist throughout most collections of this species?? Also, does the pileus become “scaly” or “hairy” when dry, like some other Armillaria species?
I like the species name.

Created: 2008-01-25 18:54:03 CST (-0500)
Last modified: 2014-07-02 12:32:07 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 366 times, last viewed: 2016-11-27 03:15:12 CST (-0500)
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