Observation 63139: Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg & O’Donnell
When: 2011-02-05
No herbarium specimen

Proposed Names

29% (1)
Recognized by sight: Pine Pitch Canker pointed out by Dr. Phil Cannon, USDA Forest Service
86% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: Dr. Bruns

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Not so natural
By: Tom Bruns (pogon)
2012-01-22 12:22:05 EST (-0500)

No, this pathogen is new to the system and does more than thin the forest. If you go to some of those hill sides all the trees are dead. The usual forest thinner in that system is gall rust.

Are these part of the post fire pines?
By: Ron Pastorino (Ronpast)
2012-01-22 12:07:04 EST (-0500)

I wonder if this isn’t, in part anyway, of the natural cycle that occurs when so many Bishop pines erupt in a single time frame. They are so dense in some post fire areas that there has to be some kind of natural weeding out process in the competition for limited nutrients.

That is so sad.
By: Tom Bruns (pogon)
2012-01-22 11:51:29 EST (-0500)

Darvin – I’m been watching those hillside die at Pt Reyes for several years now. Its really, really sad. There are some scary before and after photos of the hills behind H-ranch that I should dig out and post., but its going to get a lot worst. We’ll likely lose a lot of mushrooms (including Boletus edulis) as a result of the loss of bishop pine in the area.

As far as I know the correct name for fungus is now Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg & O’Donnell 1998. Kerry O’Donnell showed it was distinct from F. subglutinans a few years ago with a very thorough multigene analysis. Surprisingly I don’t think we know where it came from yet, although Mexico is the current theory.

Created: 2011-02-06 16:14:26 EST (-0500)
Last modified: 2012-01-22 13:14:31 EST (-0500)
Viewed: 63 times, last viewed: 2016-10-26 12:37:16 EDT (-0400)
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