Observation 63846: Pluteus Fr.
When: 2008-06-11
No herbarium specimen

Notes: 3 of 4 – the one with clamp connections, especially in the stipe. Growing on birch, which is the most common Pluteus substrate in our area which is essentially an endless pure birch forest.

Clamps suggest P. pouzarianus but a) it’s not listed for our area, which is probably because no one bothered to have a close look at Pluteus sect. Pluteus, b) P. pouzarianus grows on conifers, and substrate change is not an easy decision for a fungus :)

See observation 63844 for the story.

Species Lists

Images

135595
Specimen in situ, growing on a substrate that most of the local Pluteus species prefer – a small rotting birch log.
135596
Slightly clavate pileus terminal elements; there are occasional clamps here and there, but they’re hard to spot.
135597
Cross-section of the pileipellis, bottom-up :) you can see some clamps here with some efffort.
135598
Stipe hyphae with numerous articulations and clamps.
135599
Stipe hyphae
135600
Basidia, rather stocky-looking
135601
Basidia, rather stocky-looking
135602
cheilocystidium
135603
cheilcystidia
135604
pleurocystidia
135605
spores
135606
lamella cross-section
135607
pleurocystidium showing the typical branching of the projections – there’s a small peak projecting upwards from the claw-like larger ones, which are often recurved

Proposed Names

-28% (1)
Recognized by sight
Based on microscopic features
55% (1)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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yes, they are
By: Tatiana Bulyonkova (ressaure)
2011-02-24 07:14:54 PST (-0800)

some of them were still bearing spores, and you can still see the sterigmata; the basidioles (paraphyses) of this specimen are also very “fat”, ovoid or broadly ellipsoid, but without sterigmata. There were some narrower basidia closer to the lamella base, but I’d say it’s the average shape for this particular specimen at least, I’ve taken a bunch of photos to be able to express it quantitatively. Overall a rather strange one (reminds of Pluteus sect. Hispiduloderma in terms of basidia).

P.S. I guess you meant the caption|picture shift %)

Nice micro pictures
By: Johannes Harnisch (Johann Harnisch)
2011-02-24 06:51:39 PST (-0800)

IS picture #5 really basidia?

Created: 2011-02-24 06:22:25 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2011-02-24 07:18:53 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 107 times, last viewed: 2016-11-22 00:46:11 PST (-0800)
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