Observation 64426: Amanita phalloides (Fr.) Link
When: 2011-03-16
No herbarium specimen

Proposed Names

93% (5)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: G.C.A VAN DER WESTHUIZEN & ALBERT EICKER
FIELD GUIDE MUSHROOMS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
PAGE 38

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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this looks like phalloides to me, too, and we see them here in CA all the time…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2011-09-29 08:46:07 PDT (-0700)

A. marmorata has a more marbled affect on its cap, although both species have apparently been introduced to S. Africa.

Eucalyptus…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2011-04-24 14:40:34 PDT (-0700)

I know that A. marmorata came to South Africa with Australis trees. It is VERY like A. phalloides, and was once called A. reidii in South Africa before it was realized that it had a name “in its home country.” Do you know both phalloides and marmorata (aka reidii) in with your collecting experience?

Amanita marmorata was also imported into Hawaii with Australian trees. It is known to contain amatoxins as A. phalloides does. So it is is just as dangerous in terms of a public health hazard.

Very best,

Rod

Eucalyptus…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2011-04-24 14:40:18 PDT (-0700)

I know that A. marmorata came to South Africa with Australis trees. It is VERY like A. phalloides, and was once called A. reidii in South Africa before it was realized that it had a name “in its home country.” Do you know both phalloides and marmorata (aka reidii) in with your collecting experience?

Amanita marmorata was also imported into Hawaii with Australian trees. It is known to contain amatoxins as A. phalloides does. So it is is just as dangerous in terms of a public health hazard.

Very best,

Rod

Amanita phalloides
By: Glen van Niekerk (primordius)
2011-04-24 11:12:44 PDT (-0700)

Yes, European oak indeed! It is an imported species and was planted in rows to create nearly a square kilometer of trees. This photo (about 3 hours drive)was not taken in my home town but I have recently found them growing in my home town on Eucalyptus. Never seen this before!

We are entering our winter now and it is doubtful(Too dry) if I will find a specimen for you before the summer. On the bright side, I usually hunt for Boletus edulis in the same place and there are a lot of Amanita phalloides to be found. I’ll try and find one for you. I’ll check out the website you mentioned!

With European oak?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2011-04-24 10:04:12 PDT (-0700)

From the leaves, it looks like this might have been imported to South Africa with European oak…in the case of organism producing the photographed mushroom. Am I reading the leaves correctly?

For some time people have reported A. phalloides from South Africa, correctly and incorrectly. I have never had a chance to examine a specimen that was indeed A. phalloides (although I had no doubt that they existed); and, consequently, www.amanitaceae.org (WAO) doesn’t list a specimen of A. phalloides from South Africa. I would be very greatful if you could help me rectify that matter. A dried, mature specimen (bearing spores) and a good photograph (like the one on this page) would be very much appreciated.

If you aren’t familiar with the site, WAO always credits collections by by date, collector, site, collector’s number if there is one, link to MO observtion number (if there is one), lat./long. (if available), etc. Also all images are credited to phographers and artists who captured/created them. We crop rather tightly to the mushroom(s) and don’t have the range of display size that MO provides. Hence, we think it’s very important to point our readers back to MO for full-size and uncropped images.

Very best,

Rod

Created: 2011-03-16 13:22:53 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2011-09-29 08:46:29 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 189 times, last viewed: 2016-10-16 13:03:36 PDT (-0700)
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