Observation 65296: Meottomyces dissimulans (Berk. & Broome) Vizzini
When: 2010-07-23
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: A collection of Meottomyces dissimulans images from different times to show the local variability of this obscure LBM.

Images

140253
2010.07.23, mixed Pinus sylvestris + Betula pendula +Salix caprea (Aegopodium podagraria, Equisetum sp., misc. herbs) forest
140254
2005.07.23, mixed Pinus sylvestris + Betula pendula +Salix sp.(Aegopodium podagraria, Equisetum sp., misc. herbs) forest
140255
140256
140257
2007.05.27 Pile of woody debris on a lawn, very large, soaked specimens
140258
same location as above, the caps are often curved like that in wet weather
140259
140260
2007.05.31, mixed Betula pendula + Caragana arborensis forest, on litter and leaves
140261
2009.06.13, same location, in clusters
140262
2008.06.12, same location, in rainy weather
140263
140503
Hymenium stained with Congo red. There are clamps at the bases of basidia. The contents of the basidia are very congophilous and become almost opaque after staining – I had to rinse the slide to get the two images of the basidia and paraphyses below.
140504
spores
140505
Basidia with paraphyses
140506
Basidia with paraphyses
140507
Cheilocystidia, which are weird-shaped long crowded cells arising from the lamella trama. Their contents are thick and they turn opaque when stained with Congo red. I used this unorthodox blue stain (I think it’s PAAG blue stain, a friend who’s a biochemist stole it for me from his lab)...
140508
cheilocystidia, PAAG-blue stained
140509
hymenium
140510
Basidia in PAAG blue
140511
Lamella trama. It’s interesting that there are no clamps on many septa in this type of tissue of this fungus while they’re abundant at the bases of basidia, in the pileipellis, the annulus, and stipe
140512
A branching tube-like hypha with no septa running along the central stratum of the lamella trama. It is filled with yellowish, translucent, refractive contents. I guess its function is similar to that of the vascular hyphae of the Amanitaceae (many Pluteus species have these “veins”, to...
140513
Lamella trama, cool fat sausages :) PAAG stain this time
140514
Lamella trama, central stratum hyphae on the left and thinner hyphae on the right which go towards the hymenium.
140515
Congo red stain of the pileipellis (an ixocutis). It is very well-gelatinized and Congo red sticks to it poorly – basically what you see is the play of refraction lines as you change the focus on the microscope. Only the septa and clamps of the gelatinized hyphae are more or less stained.
140516
Another Congo red stain of the pileipellis and the underlying non-gelatinized hyphae (suprapellis and subpellis). Note how well the non-gelatinized hyphae are stained.
140517
I used the PAAG blue stain to highlight the contents of the cells in the gelatinized hyphae. Compare it to the first picture of the same tissue stained with Congo red.
140518
another PAAG stain of the ixocutis
140519
another detail of the annulus. I rinsed the stained slide and damaged cells became lighter – this helps to grasp the scale of separate cells in the hyphae.
140520
another shot of the annulus. Clamps everywhere!
140521
Stipitipellis hyphae – I haven’t looked at the stipe tissues attentively yet.

Proposed Names

83% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
Based on microscopic features

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
cool log!
By: Britney Ramsey (Riverdweller)
2011-04-10 12:27:13 CDT (-0500)
!
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2011-04-08 16:18:34 CDT (-0500)

Really cool mushroom and excellent photos portraying the variability!!

nice story Tatiana!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2011-04-08 16:12:21 CDT (-0500)

Created: 2011-04-08 15:16:32 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2011-04-10 12:42:23 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 566 times, last viewed: 2016-11-06 23:15:37 CST (-0600)
Show Log