Observation 65930: Rhizopogon Fr. & Nordholm
When: 2011-04-11
(37.7278° 119.6142° )
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: No distinctive smell, the gleba seemed a little gelatinous. It reminds me a bit of R. olivaceotinctus, but the gleba seems way too pale, but this could be because its not fully mature.

Proposed Names

47% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: This did not strike me as a Rhizopogon when I picked it up, but I’m not sure why
Based on microscopic features: The spore seem very boletoid and could fit in with the genus, but are a bit odd in shape and a little large and narrow 10-12 X 1.6-2.0
16% (2)
Used references: Arora, Mushrooms Demystified; NATS Field Guide. The most mature area of the gleba does appear to have gelatinous pockets, which are found only in Alpova. Spore size matches both Rhizopogon and Alpova, but the thick peridium and gelatinous gleba support Alpova better. Gleba from the first 2 photos shows light olive gleba with one black area. Alpova olivaceoniger must be one of the suggestions here.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
I know about the transfer, but…
By: Tom Bruns (pogon)
2012-12-19 11:49:12 PST (-0800)

The Rhizopogon’s that Trappe transferred into Alpova, aren’t likely to stay there because sequence data shows that they are Rhizopogons. Real Alpova is off in the Boletoid clade, while these are in the Suilloid clade, That’s the case with olivaceotinctus for sure, and probably this species (assuming that’s what it is) as well. Grubisha might have moved them already.

About olivaceotinctus. I’ve found that on the coast and the sequence matched the type. This collection looks really different from that, but I don’t think we have a sequence for it yet.

Dr. James Trappe
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-12-19 11:33:04 PST (-0800)

renamed Rhizopogon olivaceoniger (Smith) into Alpova after creating that genus in 1975. A. olivaceoniger is from the PNW.

Described in Smith, Smith & Weber’s How to Know the Non-Gilled Mushrooms, p. 276, as “In coniferous forests, probably associated with Pinus and Picea; July through October; Nova Scotia. This species was called Rhizopogon olivaceoniger in the previous edition.” Also “…gleba exuding a yellowish pink fluid where cut, chamber contents pallid when young, brown at maturity…”

There may be some confusion with Alpova olivaceotinctus (Smith) Trappe, which can be found in Handbook to Strategy 1 Fungal Species in the Northwest Forest Plan. Known from Siskiyou Co, Plumas Co, and Riverside Counties, CA; from Jackson Co in Oregon; and from 2 unspecified locations in “coastal northern California.” In its description, the “GLEBA exuding a latex when fresh, as dried the locules filled and separated by pallid veins, the locule contents yellow-brown.” Associated with true fir, madrone, Ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir and California Black oak.

Original source for both A. olivaceoniger and A. olivaceotinctus is: Trappe, J.M. 1975. A revision of the genus Alpova with notes on Rhizopogon and the Melanogastraceae. Nova Hedwigia Beih. 51:279-309.

Fruiting times seems a little off, but may just be very poorly collected. Reported from June, October, November and February.

species might be right, but I doubt its a real Alpova anymore
By: Tom Bruns (pogon)
2012-12-19 10:46:50 PST (-0800)

I think the only real Alpovas are now related to the alder one diplopholeus (or however it is spelled). Thinks like olivaceotinctinus for example, have gone back to Rhizopogon, and I think olivaceoniger would be there too. As for the species, I thought that was a southeastern thing?

species might be right, but I doubt its a real Alpova anymore
By: Tom Bruns (pogon)
2012-12-19 10:46:29 PST (-0800)

I think the only real Alpovas are now related to the alder one diplopholeus (or however it is spelled). Thinks like olivaceotinctinus for example, have gone back to Rhizopogon, and I think olivaceoniger would be there too. As for the species, I thought that was a southeastern thing?

Not certain Rhizopogon either.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2011-04-24 00:01:08 PDT (-0700)

The peridium is too thick for almost all species of Rhizopogon. And the gleba appears to have at least one area where the center turns bluish (3rd photo), with pinkish tones on the outer areas. I’m not saying this is a match, but check out Destuntzia rubra. Might be a closer match depending on what trees were nearby. I personally have never found Destuntzia, so this is just a guess as well.

Created: 2011-04-22 14:17:32 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2016-04-28 16:58:16 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 80 times, last viewed: 2016-11-15 14:21:51 PST (-0800)
Show Log