Observation 71197: Ganoderma curtisii (Berk.) Murrill
When: 2011-07-08
No herbarium specimen

Notes: about 3-4 pores per mm and growing of the roots of a red oak killed by a combination of fire ants and ash.

Some of the ones growing last year are now putting out new growth. Most of them proved to be annual and die back over the Winter, but I ca see two which have thus far appeared to be biennial.

Images

159622
156961
156962
This is some tea to be.
156963
156970
158212
161688
This is the specimen which was photographed on 7/09/11. Also, note the dull coloration on the varnish.
161689
This is the specimen which was photographed on 7/09/11. Also, note the dull coloration on the varnish.
161690
This is the specimen which was photographed on 7/09/11. Also, note the dull coloration on the varnish.
163569
Note that the spore deposit is washing off in the midst of a rain.
227029
More have popped up this year. The ones photographed were found approx. 50 ft. from last year’s patch in the vicinity of red and white oaks. I’ve found at least 15 so far in the past 2 weeks.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Biennials …
By: Stephen (Ιερονυμοσ)
2014-07-31 01:05:14 CDT (-0500)

As I learned it in botany, a biennial is a(n) “plant (organism) which completes its life cycle in two years.” Daucus carota is a good example. Its first year growth is purely vegetative and its second year is its flowering. These Ganoderma can have a living sporocarp which can persist up to two years(I beleive image 156963 grew well into 2012), surviving Winter to continue growth the following year. Perhaps it can even be triennial or perennial given the right cold seasons. Ganoderma appalantum is considered perennial as a single sporocarp can continue growing over multiple years, leading to large specimens.

I need to find my photo from 2012 as it absolutely did continue growth into a second year.

Biennial
By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2014-07-30 14:09:16 CDT (-0500)

This term means to fruit every other year, or that it takes two years to fruit(usually used with plants). These are annuals and just happen to fruit from the same location each year. There doesn’t appear to be any regrowth of the old specimens.

Sometimes biennial
By: Stephen (Ιερονυμοσ)
2012-06-21 19:06:50 CDT (-0500)

Most fruit bodies died back but at least one continues to grow this year. More pins have popped up over the course of June.

Here’s a YouTube Video Showing Some Progress
By: Stephen (Ιερονυμοσ)
2011-07-21 20:48:20 CDT (-0500)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K16r5_TVCQo

So far, it seems to match the description for G. curtisii to me. Please object if that’s wrong.

Created: 2011-07-08 20:02:12 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2015-08-30 22:55:50 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 268 times, last viewed: 2016-05-28 06:55:00 CDT (-0500)
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