Observation 72667: Entonaema liquescens Möller
When: 2009-06-17
No herbarium specimen

Proposed Names

73% (3)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
-45% (2)
Recognized by sight: pale interior, reddish coloration on surface

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Good points Danny
By: Drew Parker (mycotrope)
2012-09-18 08:11:38 CEST (+0200)

Your first point concerning the orange granules surrounding the perithecia not being visible in my photo does have some validity. I’ll add a shot with a little better detail which I think would show some hint of an orange hue if it were present.

The orange base, as you mentioned, is in agreement with the literature and is seen in both the Florida observation and the most recent post from Illinois. Outside of the base, which is prominent in my photos because of the ascoma’s orientation, these were sulfur yellow with a distinct greenish reaction where injured. As you observed, there was no orange masking coat of pruina over the surface.

When I collected these I was visiting family, traveling light, and wasn’t prepared for finding a collection of this significance. At first sight I was baffled by its strangeness. I didn’t have a tripod or easy way to dry it. So regretfully I didn’t give it the treatment it deserved. I will return to this locale probably next spring, and if I’m lucky enough to see it again, I will be prepared.

Drew
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2012-09-18 00:13:17 CEST (+0200)

I’ve been meaning to return to this one for a while. Sorry for the hold up.

A few points:

1. “One outstanding character which separates E. cinnabarina from other undoubted species of Entonaema discussed herein is the reddish orange pigmentation surrounding the perithecia."

Elsewhere this is described as orange granules or powder which are best seen in cross section. Here’s an image from Asturnatura.com that demonstrates this well:

I think it’s safe to assume this would lend an overall reddish orange cast to all or part of the stromatal surface when seen at arm’s length, at least everywhere but the mature “ostiolar papillae” which said granules surround at maturity. Since none of these photos show fine detail of the perithecia in cross section, this may not be a feature we have the luxury of claiming present or absent. There is, however, distinct orange coloration concentrated toward the base in your observation. According to the same 1981 Mycologia article, E. liquescens can either “occasionally [have] orange tones" or is specifically characterized by “the general lack of orange coloration and the complete lack of interior orange granules around the perithecia.” If bloodworm’s Florida posting of E. liquescens is any indication, when and where orange exists in that species, it may primarily/exclusively occur at the base:

One point in the E. liquescens collumn.

According to the “Pyrenomycetes from Southweestern France” site, when immature, E. cinnabarina is “coated with a pale luteous (11) pruina readily rubbed off” [http://pyrenomycetes.free.fr/...]. If that’s the case here, the characteristic orange granules may be obscured behind that pruina. Then again, an easily-removable pruina doesn’t seem to be present in this ob. You’ve clearly handled these, and the only discoloration to show up seems to be the slight “greening”, another apparent hallmark of E. liquescens.

Two more points in the E. liquescens collumn.

The distribution of each sp. circa 1981 makes for a third, but NA records for E. cinnabarina may have cropped up since then.

I concede. This is probably E. liquescens. Try and re-observe this one if you can. There’s not much good color photography of these out there. An observation showcasing a range of stages of development could be very valuable.

Rogers, 1981 Micologia -
By: Drew Parker (mycotrope)
2012-08-24 09:33:49 CEST (+0200)

For E. cinnabarina – “One outstanding character which separates E. cinnabarina from
other undoubted species of Entonaema discussed herein is the reddish
orange pigmentation surrounding the perithecia. According to Patouillard
(1911) and Petch (1924) immature stromata are yellow red, or
orange, becoming more brown or blackish as they mature.”

This is not seen here in my opinion.

For E. liquescens – “surface usually bright sulfur yellow to dull yellow or
olive yellow, sometimes discoloring greenish when handled fresh,
occasionally with orange tones.”

These discolored greenish as seen in the third photo. E. cinnabarina should not be this yellow. Also Known distribution would favor E. liquescens.

“Entonaema liquescens is a distinctive species. It is distinct from E.
cinnabarina in its predominantly yellow color and the general lack of
orange coloration and the complete lack of interior orange granules
around the perithecia.”

I’m convinced this is E. liquescens.

Not currently
By: Drew Parker (mycotrope)
2011-07-26 18:15:13 CEST (+0200)

These are from a couple of years ago. I was there this April, but the fungi were few.

More photos!
By: damon brunette (damonbrunette)
2011-07-26 17:48:56 CEST (+0200)

Awesome! Are you on vacation down there?

Created: 2011-07-26 07:56:26 CEST (+0200)
Last modified: 2012-09-18 00:13:34 CEST (+0200)
Viewed: 196 times, last viewed: 2016-08-01 00:47:44 CEST (+0200)
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