Observation 72763: Tubifera ferruginosa (Batsch) Gmelin
When: 2011-06-15
(46.32336° 13.58299° )
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Code: Bot_522/2011_DSC8074
Code: Bot_523/2011_DSC8093
Code: Bot_526/2011_IMG5439 +DSC8154

Habitat: Roadside of a dirt forest road surrounded by almost pure Fagus sylvatica forest, NW faced steep mountain slope, calcareous bedrock, quite humid and shady place, exposed to direct rain, average precipitations ~ 3.000 mm/year, average temperature 7-9 deg C, elevation 655 m (2.150 feet), alpine phytogeographical region.

Substratum: almost completely decomposed trunk of a deciduous tree lying on ground in abundant ground vegetation and bushes; almost certainly not a conifer, most probably Fagus sylvatica.

Place: Bovec basin, NW slopes of Javoršček Mountain, 1.557 m (5.109 feet), toward the end of forest dirty road, East Julian Alps, Posočje, Slovenia EC

Comments: Growing in several clusters on a decomposed log. The size of the largest clumps was about 2.5 × 1.5 cm (1 × 0.7 inch). Photographs have been made on three different days, one and five days after the first visit.

Macro and micro characters fit well to Tubiferra ferruginosa, which is a common slime mold. However I am wandering about the picture No.12. One can see a pseudoaethalia in a quite decomposed state where many of individual sporangia have a small pink bump in the center, which looks like a pseudocapillitium, which takes the form of a columnella-like central body. If my assumption is correct then this character may eventually testify for a Tubireffa casparyi, which is much less common than T. ferruginosa. Unfortunately, I was unable to find additional information about this species or some additional information whether such a central body can be seen also on Tubiferra ferruginosa. A second ‘problem’ is the log. According to Ref. (2) T. ferruginosa substrate are confers and rarely alder or birch. It is almost certain that the log in my case was none of these. There are no alders or birches around and its appearance, though almost nearly totally decomposed, didn’t look like a conifer. Any expert opinion would be appreciated very much.

Nikon D700 / Nikkor Micro 105mm/f2.8 and Canon G11, 6.1-30mm/f2.8-4.5

Species Lists

Images

160115
Young bright orange-red not yet ripe pseudoaethalium.
160109
This could be an early phase of pseudoaethalium development where cylindrical sporangia are not yet developed? Not sure if true. Could be also another kind of slime mold. White hypothallus can be seen.
160110
Young bright orange-red not yet ripe pseudoaethalium.
160111
Young bright orange-red not yet ripe pseudoaethalium.
160112
Spores finely warty. Dimensions: 6.8 (SD = 0.3) x 6.5 (SD = 0.3) micr., Q = 1.04 (SD = 0.2), n = 30. Motic B2-211A, magnification 1.000 x, oil, in water.
160113
160114
Young bright orange-red not yet ripe pseudoaethalium.
160116
Almost ripe stage of the pseudoaethalium. Only some sporangia are still reddish.
160117
Grown up pseudoaethalium. Yellow blobs are probably another kind of slim mold.
160118
Grown up pseudoaethalium. Yellow blobs are probably another kind of slim mold.
160119
Partly decayed stage.
160121
Partly decayed stage of pseudoaethalium. Many sporangia show pink central body, eventually a kind of ‘columnella’ or ‘capillitium’?
160122
Completely decayed stage of pseudoaethalium, mostly spore mass.
160123
The log – substratum.

Proposed Names

71% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
Used references: (1) B. Ing, The Myxomycetes of Britain and Ireland,The Richmond Publ. Co.Ltd, (1999), p 95.
(2) S.L.Stephenson and H.Stempen, Myxomycetes, Timber Press Inc.(2000), p 159.
Based on microscopic features: Spores finely warty. Dimensions: 6.8 (SD = 0.3) x 6.5 (SD = 0.3) micr., Q = 1.04 (SD = 0.2), n = 30. Motic B2-211A, magnification 1.000 x, oil, in water.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

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Created: 2011-07-27 14:21:03 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2012-04-05 01:56:38 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 191 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 18:17:04 PDT (-0700)
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