Observation 79217: Phaeocollybia R. Heim
When: 2011-10-07
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Very long pseudorhiza.

Spores rusty orange brown, no germ pore.

Pleurocystidia mucronate to subcapitate, cheilocystidia subcapitate.

Images

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173895
cheilocystidia
173898
pleurocystidia
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pleurocystidia
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spores 1000x, 1 micrometer divisions
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cheilocystidia
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cheilocystidia
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cheilocystidia
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Spores 1000x
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Spores 1000x
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Spores 1000x
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Spores 1000x
186114

Proposed Names

38% (6)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
-46% (7)
Recognized by sight
-51% (4)
Recognized by sight: hygrophanous cap, rusty brown spores w/out a germ pore, delicate fruit body, growing in moss.
-2% (3)
Recognized by sight: or, none of the above.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Try Phaeocollybia singularis
By: Lorelei Norvell (Lorelei)
2012-10-23 19:11:36 CDT (-0400)

Hi Alan —

Thanks for alerting me to this find. The tibiiform cheilocystidia, dark violaceous black pileus, violaceous stipe, slender stature, and amygdaliform basidiospores suggest P. singularis, which I collected with Roy Halling in Costa Rica (around 20 miles from the Panama border) twelve years ago. Horak & Halling described it in 1991 from Colombia, Both collections were associated with oak (although the Costa Rican oaks were surrounded by non-ectomycorrhizal megaphylls).

Are there clamp connections?

There is more information on these small phaeocollybias in a recent Mycotaxon paper by Coimbra & al. [Phaeocollybia nigripes (Agaricomycetes), a new species from Brazil — http://dx.doi/10.5248/120.171 ] and the Horak & Halling Pacific Northwest Fungi paper [Phaeocollybia longistipitata sp. nov. from Costa Rica — doi: 10.2509/naf2008.003.00711.

Nice find Alan,
By: Michael W (Michael Wallace)
2011-10-11 01:04:14 CDT (-0400)

….I tend to agree with your first proposal of Phaeocollybia with the viscid conic cap with an inrolled margin and stipe with long pseudorhiza, the fairly verrucose spores that lack an apical germ pore or plage and the snout like apical extension are all characteristics that point towards Phaeocollybia, the only thing that looks a bit unusual is the surface of the stipe?

this oddity calls for some wild proposals!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2011-10-10 16:47:06 CDT (-0400)

looked up Mythicomyces on the PNW key. They had a photo and description, but there is apparently only one species in the Genus (or was when the key was first made) and this isn’t it.

http://tinyurl.com/3o8ygx3

And of course, I’ve never seen a Galerina either that had a rooting stipe like this one…although up until where it hit the ground, it’s a pretty good likeness.

Curiouser and curiouser.

Mythicomyces?
By: else
2011-10-10 16:32:11 CDT (-0400)

i’ve never seen one, so this is just a wild proposal. The spores in Mythicomcyes are said to be verrucose and brown, without a germ pore, and there should be metuloid (thick-walled) cystidia.

Yes,
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2011-10-10 14:19:35 CDT (-0400)

I scoped this. The spores were similar to Cortnarius spores. Rusty brown, eliptical to almond shaped, no germ pore.

very interesting mushroom…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2011-10-10 10:34:23 CDT (-0400)

not a Phaeocollybia with that roughened, fibrillose stipe, despite its rooting nature.

didja get a spore print? I see more brown than pink…

have you scoped this?
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2011-10-10 04:14:58 CDT (-0400)

Created: 2011-10-09 23:41:13 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2012-11-01 01:43:45 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 284 times, last viewed: 2016-11-22 10:33:57 CST (-0500)
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