Observation 79505: Hygrocybe (Fr.) P. Kumm.
When: 2011-10-09
No herbarium specimen

Notes: No odor or taste.

Species Lists

Red

Images

174648
174646
174647
174649
174650
174651
174652
174653
174654
174655
190595
Specimen ready for microscopy
190596
Spores 1000x
190597
Spores 1000x
190598
Spores 1000x

Proposed Names

65% (4)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: No flavor or odor.
-23% (2)
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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nice follow-up Alan.
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2014-10-02 16:48:50 PDT (-0700)
Red Gliophorus
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2014-10-02 14:40:45 PDT (-0700)

I think there are some red Gliophorus (or at least things we’d currently call Gliophorus).

This one looks more pinkish, but either way, I would not be surprised if it did belong to the clade with Gliophorus in it. Except for the stipe being dry, it reminds me of these observation 49686

Here’s one:
http://en.wikipedia.org/...

And then there are the reddish-orange forms of G. psittacinus that can be found across most of the range (which sometimes get called G. perplexus).

And sometimes G. laetus looks very red: observation 137542

There’s also a very orange one in Santa Cruz that I’ve been provisionally calling G. fenestrus.

Thanks for following up.
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2014-10-02 14:30:22 PDT (-0700)
Spoke with Dr. Lodge
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2014-10-02 14:18:20 PDT (-0700)

She says this collection is definitely a Hygrocybe due to the pigmentation. While there are some very viscid Hygrocybe species, the pigments are different in Hygrocybe and Gliophorus. There are no red Gliophorus species.

My mistake
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2014-10-02 12:18:07 PDT (-0700)

Neither is G. psittacinus, necessarily. I have found it in a decidedly non-viscid, fresh state.

G. psittacina is extremely viscid
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2014-10-02 09:33:17 PDT (-0700)

As are all members of Gliophorus, as far as I know. G. psittacina is so viscid that it is difficult to pull out of the ground without breaking it.

next time …
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2014-10-02 09:13:10 PDT (-0700)

send these to Jean Lodge.

Neither is G. psittacinus
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2014-10-02 08:37:06 PDT (-0700)

which this resembles. The pearlescent stipe is the main feature drawing my attention.

This species is not very viscid
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2014-10-02 07:35:30 PDT (-0700)

I think Hygrocybe is more likely than Gliophorus.

spectacular!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2011-12-21 10:34:26 PST (-0800)

looking forward to your “Mexican Mushroom Greatest Hits” program (your title may vary) for BAMS, in May!

Yeah
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2011-10-14 20:29:36 PDT (-0700)

seems like it must be… but this is Mexico.

By: caphillkid
2011-10-14 14:14:43 PDT (-0700)

Striking colors. Maybe Hygrocybe?

Created: 2011-10-13 18:54:22 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2014-10-02 14:11:56 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 173 times, last viewed: 2016-10-26 07:21:22 PDT (-0700)
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