Observation 81288: Gomphus bonarii (Morse) Singer

Proposed Names

31% (3)
Recognized by sight
Used references: Identified by David Arora
59% (2)
Recognized by sight: new name for old mushroom.
94% (4)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: G. bonarii is what we were calling the pale, mountain conifer form that often fruits in clusters. I see that MO lists the name as “deprecated” and lists T. floccosus as the correct name, but after checking out Index Fungorum, searching Biosis, and looking for ITS sequencing in GenBank, I don’t see any strong evidence that these two are synonyms.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Yup.
By: Dimitar Bojantchev (dimitar)
2011-11-06 09:19:42 CST (+0800)

Tom, thank you for pointing that out. I was wondering recently as we saw two million Gomphus fruitbodies around Shasta and I couldn’t recall who synonymized what lately and why…

Indeed, the The Fungal Biology 114: 224-234. doi:10.1016/j.funbio.2010.01.002 article that they refer to in the Mycotaxon 115 paper really uses overly conserved gene regions, plus even there you see plenty of “noise” in the T. floccosus area and certainly an indication of more than one species if one gets more finely granular data. Synonymizing these on the presented data apears way premature.

Dimitar

here is the rest of the comment on the name bonarii that was truncated
By: Tom Bruns (pogon)
2011-11-06 08:42:37 CST (+0800)

G. bonarii is what we were calling the pale, mountain conifer form that often fruits in clusters. I see that MO lists the name as “deprecated” and lists T. floccosus as the correct name, but after checking out Index Fungorum, searching Biosis, and looking for ITS sequencing in GenBank, I don’t see any strong evidence that these two are synonyms.

I do see the Mycotaxon paper by Giachini and Castellano (2010) that lists the synonymy, but the molecular evidence they point to is all based on conserved genes. I think it’s worth retaining the names a little longer until the evidence is more compelling. The Sierra and coastal forms sure look and behave a little different.

The molecular evidence is very convincing about Turbinellus being the correct genus, but it doesn’t look like a new combinaiton for G. bonarii has been made, since they just reduced it to a synonym.

Created: 2011-11-02 15:00:50 CST (+0800)
Last modified: 2013-12-06 11:02:32 CST (+0800)
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