Observation 82704: Lactarius pubescens var. betulae (A.H. Sm.) Hesler & A.H. Sm.
When: 2011-11-17
Who: PolloAsado
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Fruiting in dense clusters along cement walkway. Cheilocystidia present. Warted, subglobose, amyloid spores. Sinuate gill attachment. Canescent pileal surface. Cartilaginous context. Faint smell of cucumbers.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

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I had heard
By: PolloAsado
2011-11-19 05:27:41 EET (+0200)

the same thing elsewhere. I haven’t seen birch any other location.

I always find it
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2011-11-17 18:08:01 EET (+0200)

within 100 yards of there. I haven’t seen it anywhere else. There aren’t a whole lot of birch on campus. Where there is birch, this mushroom is pretty common. They did tree study where they recorded the gps coordinates and species of every tree on campus and I have the data, I could check where all the birch are. I mostly use it for finding porcini by mapping all of the monterrey pine trees.

latex
By: PolloAsado
2011-11-17 12:04:27 EET (+0200)

I had initially presumed it was Lactarius, but in finding no latex I had moved onto something in Tricholomataceae. Thanks for the input, definitely appreciate it. And peppery it was…. By the way, does that seem to be the only spot on campus with pubescens?

Latex
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2011-11-17 11:41:02 EET (+0200)

All Lactarius exude latex when fresh and young, but when they dry out a but it they often don’t. Taste a little, it will be very peppery. I know where you found those and have collected them in the same place.

latex
By: PolloAsado
2011-11-17 11:14:46 EET (+0200)

Are there Lactarius that don’t exude a latex? When cut, this specimen stayed dry.

Created: 2011-11-17 10:51:09 EET (+0200)
Last modified: 2011-11-17 11:16:28 EET (+0200)
Viewed: 67 times, last viewed: 2016-10-28 13:26:57 EEST (+0300)
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