Observation 83579: Camarophyllopsis Herink
When: 2011-11-28
Who: Byrain
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Really tiny! Growing from mossy ground along the side of a horse/bike trail.

Images

185992
185993
185994
186097
186695
Encrusted hyphae in the pileipellis with clamps
1000x
Mounted in melzers
1μ divisions
186696
Encrusted hyphae in the pileipellis with clamps
1000x
Mounted in melzers
1μ divisions
186697
Cheilocystidia
1000x
Mounted in melzers
1μ divisions
186698
Pleurocystidia
1000x
Mounted in melzers
1μ divisions
186721
4 spored basidium and spores
1000x
Mounted in melzers
1μ divisions
186722
Caulocystidia
1000x
Mounted in KOH
1μ divisions
186723
Caulocystidia
1000x
Mounted in KOH
1μ divisions
186724
Caulocystidia
1000x
Mounted in KOH
1μ divisions
186725
Caulocystidia showing a clamp
1000x
Mounted in KOH
1μ divisions
186726
Spores on stipe
186953
Suprapellis
1000x
Mounted in KOH
1μ divisions
186954
Lamellar trama
1000x
mounted in KOH
1μ divisions

Proposed Names

31% (3)
Recognized by sight: gestalt. microscopy will say for certain.
57% (1)
Recognized by sight
77% (1)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Microscopy
By: Byrain
2011-12-01 04:03:25 PST (-0800)

I went back to the spot today and found nothing, but a few completely dessicated specimens. Though, upon looking for caulocystidia I found out what happened to all the spores, they’re up on the stipe…

The spores are hyaline, smooth, non-amyloid, and without a without a germ pore. Appearing the same as the smaller hyaline spores around the gill edges, from 30 measurements the range is (7) 8 – 10 × 5 – 6 (7) μ, the average size is 8.87 × 5.62 μ, and the average Q is 1.59. The caulocystidia occasionally have clamp connections and are very abundant!

Also, the trees these were fruiting near are pine, oak, something Acacia-like, Ginkgo biloba, something in the Ulmaceae family, I think a Zelkova sp., and cottonwood a little farther away.

Dessicated
By: Byrain
2011-11-29 22:41:23 PST (-0800)

They’re tiny and dry out really fast, I’m not sure I will get much from a print when its tough to find even a few spores on the gills. Maybe if I tried yesterday, or if any of the pins I left behind mature. I will go looking for a good specimen to print tomorrow.

print one
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2011-11-29 22:05:05 PST (-0800)

and mount the spores.

Somewhat fishy odor
By: Byrain
2011-11-29 18:42:43 PST (-0800)

I’m not really familiar with the moth ball scent, but after reading a little and asking others, I would say they don’t. They smell more faintly fishy, not the rotten smell some Amanitas have.

C. foetens look similar, but these have darker gills, especially with time.

odor like moth balls?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2011-11-29 18:32:03 PST (-0800)

how bout camarophyllopsis foetens, like these:

http://mushroomobserver.org/image/show_image/133243?obs=63000&q=9qEw

just read Christian’s post, and looked harder at photos.

nah.

More micro details
By: Byrain
2011-11-29 18:24:10 PST (-0800)

After looking at it a bit more, I realized the smaller smooth hyaline spores were mostly around the gill edge/face and then I found some next to a 4-spored basidia with very similar looking spores attached. I am thinking these are the most likely candidates. Also, the pileipellis has roughened hyphae with clamps. I’ll add micrographs probably later tonight or tomorrow.

Spores…
By: Byrain
2011-11-29 17:01:29 PST (-0800)

I’m looking at this now and I am not sure how much spores will help as there appear to be multiple kinds.
Two smooth hyaline ones without a germ pore of different sizes, the smaller is more plentiful.
Two kinds of brown spores, one smooth with a germ pore which might be from a Psathyrella I collected, the other slightly roughened without a germ pore, both of these are the easiest spores to find and most tend to be in the cap context.
And perhaps a single smooth and strongly amyloid spore. Not to mention a single larger brown Psathyrella looking spore and another very large spore with thick walls which is probably from something else.

I have also found pleurocystidia and the cheilocystidia is hard to differentiate from the basidioles and gill edge.

Edit: The tackle box was washed yesterday before I found these and the other species I collected are two Psathyrella spp., a Pholiotina sp., and something that looks like a very small Tubaria.

Colors
By: Byrain
2011-11-28 22:49:47 PST (-0800)

The cap is grey/brown, the gills are a similar color except more pale. I added another picture with fairly good colors and showing the size.

Pretty
By: vjp
2011-11-28 22:18:38 PST (-0800)

mushrooms

How would you describe the gill and cap color?

Thanks for the tips.
By: Byrain
2011-11-28 21:39:05 PST (-0800)

I was thinking this was something omphalinoid, but now that you say Laccaria I see how it could be. As for the trees I remember pine, oak and cottonwood. I can check again if it turns out to be important. I also found another lone specimen which I did not photograph growing from the same kind of mossy ground near horses under oak with pine and other trees being across the street.

And I’m definitely planning to do some microscopy along with some other lbms. Also, see if you can find the thumbtack pin next to the one of the larger pins in the first photo. :)

Those are really cool
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2011-11-28 21:22:16 PST (-0800)

nice pictures. Microscopy will go a long way on this one – check for shape (which could narrow it real fast), amyloid reactions, presence of clamps, and cystidia on the stipe.

It looks like a tiny little gray Laccaria with those fibrillose stipes.

Created: 2011-11-28 19:00:38 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2011-12-01 12:22:46 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 222 times, last viewed: 2016-10-25 12:21:30 PDT (-0700)
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