Observation 86602: Ramalina stenospora Müll. Arg.

When: 2012-01-12

Collection location: Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida, USA [Click for map]

28.0° 81.0°

Who: m.cicanese (Matthew Cicanese)

Specimen available

Notes:
Partial herbarium specimen in personal herbarium.

Proposed Names

60% (2)
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Used references: Lichens of North America

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Comments

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Welcome, Matthew!
By: Chris Parrish (kitparrish)
2012-01-20 14:18:28 PST (-0800)

Nice photos!

You may be interested in our Macrolichens of North America. This page on Ramalina will show you how it is set up.

Great news
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2012-01-20 10:51:44 PST (-0800)

Great! I would love to see more people studying Florida lichens!. Only others I know are the Seaveys in the Everglades. You’ve such an interesting flora. And you’re right at the transition from subtropical to temperate. Good stuff. I’ll be happy to help any way I can. I’ve been gathering literature for several years, that’s probably where I can help the most.

All the help I can get
By: m.cicanese (Matthew Cicanese)
2012-01-20 05:58:21 PST (-0800)

Jason,

Thank you so much for your guidance. I have a strong passion for studying these as an undergraduate, and continuing my research into graduate school. I’ve still got so much to learn, and appreciate any guidance you’re willing to give.

Sincerely,

Matthew

Hard to find good literature
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2012-01-20 01:46:45 PST (-0800)

on Ramalina in the southeast. Harris doesn’t cover this family at all. Brodo covers half the species (but does cover them well). There’s a hard-to-get thesis covering the western part of the Gulf Coast. Barbara Moore published a complete flora of the macrolichens of the state in the Bryologist back in 1968. It has many problems since so much has changed in lichenology since then. But Ramalina hasn’t changed much, at least not in the southeast where no one’s working on it anymore. I can email you a pdf of the paper if you like. The relevant part here is:

1. Thallus sorediate . . . R. dendriscoides
1. Thallus esorediate
. 2. Branches compressed throughout including the tips
. . 3. Thallus tuberculate, caespitose, branches to 5 mm broad
. . . 4. Medulla K+ red (salazinic acid) . . . R. denticulata
. . . 4. Medulla K- (divaricatic acid) . . . R. complanata
. . 3. Thallus not tuberculate, caespitose or pendulous; branches usually less than 2 mm broad
. . . 5. Thallus pendulous, to 30 cm long
. . . . 6. Medulla K- . . . R. usnea
. . . . 6. Medulla K+r (salazinic acid) . . . [R. anceps]
. . . 5. Thallus caespitose, usually less than 15 cm long
. . . . . 7. Thallus small, 5 cm long or less, not white-striate, spores ellipsoid . . . R. fastigiata
. . . . . 7. Thallus larger, to 15 cm long, white-striate, spores fusiform . . . R. stenospora
. 2. Branches terete throughout; or if compressed in part, then terete at the tips
. . 8. Medulla PD+o/r, K+r or KC+ fleeting pink/rose (salazinic, norstictic and/or protocetraric acids)
. . . 9. Thallus caespitose, usually less than 3 cm long, branches tuberculate; common along the coast . . . R. willeyi
. . . 9. Thallus pendulous, to 6 cm long, branches not tuberculate but with pale warty areas especially at the tips; rare, in the Everglades . . . R. dasypoga
. . 8. Medulla PD-, K- or K+ weak red/violet
. . . 10. Medulla KC- (sekikaic, ramalinolic and/or divaricatic acids), branches not tuberculate, usually in dry areas . . . R. montagnei
. . . 10. Medulla KC+ briefly violet (cryptochlorophaeic acid), branches tuberculate, in cypress swamps . . . R. paludosa

Two sorediate species are missing, R. peruviana and R. sorediantha (maybe only in the Everglades). Here’s a key to the sorediate species in the Gulf States: [from Jones’s 1964 thesis]

1. Branches terete . . . R. dendriscoides
1. Branches flattened
. 2. Soredia produced marginally in soralia; to 10 cm long . . . R. peruviana
. 2. Soredia produced among clusters of terminal branches; to 2 cm tall . . . R. sorediantha

The Everglades have two additional species: [from Bruce Ryan’s keys]

R. leptosperma – rare, southernmost tip of Everglades; flattened branches; laminal/marginal apothecia; strongly scrobiculate
R. subpellucida – common in Everglades; flattened branches; subterminal apothecia; smooth but striate

Hope all that helps some day! :)

Created: 2012-01-19 21:38:42 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2012-01-21 20:13:02 PST (-0800)
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