Observation 8871: Boletaceae Chevall.
When: 2008-08-05
No herbarium specimen

Notes: I was unable to find a bolete that looked like this in my field guides.

Proposed Names

6% (4)
Recognized by sight: The group to look closely at would be: C. rubinelleus, C. pseudorubinellus & C. rubritubifer.
69% (7)
Recognized by sight
4% (3)
Recognized by sight
86% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: As per discussion here: mushroomobserver.org/name/show_name/14925

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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could be
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-11-23 18:49:51 CST (-0500)

You can see that this mushroom was growing in a well mowed lawn. It was under a large hardwood tree, Oak if I recall, but it might have been maple. I did not remove a leaf, but I did clip a little grass in front of it so that you could see the base. The mushroom was growing by itself. If a leaf was on it, then it blew away before I found it. There were very few leaves on the lawn.

could it be ?
By: Johannes Harnisch (Johann Harnisch)
2009-11-23 14:51:35 CST (-0500)

that there was a leaf or some thing on the cap….? also you would need more specimens then this to make an accurate ID…..

sunburned?
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-11-21 10:17:33 CST (-0500)

It looks like a sunburned pig skin.

Boletus bicolor
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-11-21 09:21:27 CST (-0500)

Boletus bicolor looks about right, but the pattern of yellow and red on the cap seems very strange for that species.

In this observation of B. bicolor,

http://mushroomobserver.org/22550

the yellow and red blend smoothly.

The mushroom in the present observation shows a clear line of demarcation between yellow and red.

blueing rxn. in boletes
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-11-20 12:09:54 CST (-0500)

Tom Volk gives a nice treatment of the chemistry involved here:
http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/jul2003.html

I think that we have insufficient information to make a good ID here…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-11-20 12:05:19 CST (-0500)

finding younger material as well as mature forms would help a lot; also context, bluing rxns., color of basal mycelia, etc.

orange colored pores suggest Chalciporus pseudorubinellus; over-all coloration suggests Boletus bicolor (which can also have reddening pores at age).

the fact that Dan didn’t immediately think that this bolete was a bicolor, which is a very common mushroom in the Midwest, makes me lean towards the Chalciporus ID.

Closer to the B. bicolor/speciosus group?
By: Dimitar Bojantchev (dimitar)
2009-11-20 09:12:09 CST (-0500)

Aren’t these closer to the B. bicolor/speciosus group?

Which we did see with Dan in this very forest.

http://mushroomhobby.com/...
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/boletus_speciosus.html

D.
Chemistry of Bruising
By: Kathryn Kauffman (k6logc)
2009-11-20 03:25:27 CST (-0500)

Could someone explain the specific chemistry of blue bruising in boletes?

I’ve hunted around a bit for this but haven’t sorted out whether there is a standard set of reactants that are involved.

Thank you!

Chalciporus stands out in several ways…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2008-08-12 11:59:34 CDT (-0400)

…with copper-colored pores at maturity, sometimes with yellow mycelia at stipe base, and a stipe that is remarkable in what it DOESN’T have: glandular dots, partial veil, annulus, reticulation or scabers.

Getting it to sp. can be a bit more difficult, although there are only five in N. America.

Boletus sp, but did it turn blue?
By: Dimitar Bojantchev (dimitar)
2008-08-12 10:13:34 CDT (-0400)

This is a Boletus sp.

This would have been, an easy id had you made one or two additional steps. The five rules of collecting Boletes:

1) SPORE PRINT COLOR – please always make a careful observation of
that – this does the HEAVY LIFTING down to Genus for you. PINK,
CINNAMON, OLIVE, etc. Then you know whether’ you’re dealing with
Tylopilus, Leccinum, Boletus and so forth…

2) DISCOLORATION reactions – observe carefully
a) On sponge
b) On stipe
c) On context

3) TASTE – some Tylopili (mainly) are bitter. This can be a
huge factor when comparing similarly looking brownish/tan species.

4) MACROCHEMICAL reactions – you don’t need much. Just NAHO4 and
KOH do most of the heavy lifting in this group. Use them, make
notes and photos.

5) SLICE them – other than the context discoloration, in the case
of Gyroporus you may see a hollow stipe – that does your id right
there…

.
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2008-08-11 07:36:59 CDT (-0400)

The pileus looks like the hide of a decomposing pig. Heh.

Created: 2008-08-10 16:55:00 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2011-12-17 19:23:56 CST (-0500)
Viewed: 274 times, last viewed: 2016-09-30 15:43:04 CDT (-0400)
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