Observation 8910: Amanita Pers.
When: 2008-08-09
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Another single Amanita. Found a few this day, and each was alone.

Creamy off-white colors, no veil, clear volva.

9/4/2008 – From looking at spores on Aug. 30

Tissue was taken from the stipe apex to look for spores. Only 5 spores were found this way, so a rough measurement here. The mirco-shot is of a spore at 1000x in Meltzer’s. The spore is ellipsoid and slightly pointed, also it is amyloid.

Looking at the 5 spores I find ave spore : length – 8.49 +/- 0.56 (err 0.27) um, width – 6.37 +/- 0.43 (err: 0.21) – q : 1.33 +/- 0.06, on 5 spores.

Not sure if this helps make an id…

Proposed Names

61% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Looks like an Amanita

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Well, if this one is interesting enough…
By: Douglas Smith (douglas)
2008-09-23 12:19:12 PDT (-0700)

Is this is interesting enough, I might get back to it at some point. I still have the dried specimen. I’ll try to get a photo of spores from the gills to check with Meltzer’s. Although it might take a bit, I’ve got a bunch of other stuff I need to look at…

What should I look for beyond that? I don’t really look at Amanitas, not sure which features will be more taxonomically significant.

Spores from the gills…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2008-09-23 11:56:28 PDT (-0700)

Douglas, as a matter of practicality, measuring spores from gills is (for the most part) the only choice that one has since spore prints are rarely associated with exsiccata. I’ve been doing this for years. Yes, individual specimens can be really screwy; but that’s why I give a range of the averages, L, W, and Q (all bold faced) so that future workers can see the variation that I saw…and why I really like to have a lot of material of a given species on which to base taxonomic judgments.

Also, amyloid spores show up even better when they are clustered (overlapping) or in a pile (overlapping) on a surface.

The reason that I thought the spores would be inamyloid is that the cap margin is striate and the short gills are truncate. With some notable exceptions, these to characters often go with inamyloid spores. Given the apparent bulb at the stipe base and the 2 above-cited characters, I would have placed this material in sect. Amanita…possibly near A. multisquamosa. Your spore shapes would not be inconsistent with the latter taxon.

R

Spores from the gills…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2008-09-23 11:50:55 PDT (-0700)

Douglas, as a matter of practicality, measuring spores from gills is (for the most part) the only choice that one has since spore prints are rarely associated with exsiccata. I’ve been doing this for years. Yes, individual specimens can be really screwy; but that’s why I give a range of the averages, L, W, and Q (all bold faced) so that future workers can see the variation that I saw…and why I really like to have a lot of material of a given species on which to base taxonomic judgments.

Also, amyloid spores show up even better when they are clustered (overlapping) or in a pile (overlapping) on a surface.

R

Spores were amyloid
By: Douglas Smith (douglas)
2008-09-23 11:42:12 PDT (-0700)

The spores here were amyloid. I find that when the spore is on its own in the scope image, the amyloid reaction doesn’t always come through in the photo. It was easier to see in comparison with the veil tissue, but there was no veil tissue here. Also I didn’t find that many spores, so I think this one was rather young, I could find more spores from the gills, but I don’t trust the size measurements of spores that way.

cannot identify…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2008-09-22 21:39:14 PDT (-0700)

I don’t remember this species from the first time around. Thanks for calling my attention to it. I’d guess the spores were inamyloid. I don’t think I know the taxon. Which makes me want to know more about it.

R

Created: 2008-08-10 20:18:44 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2008-09-04 09:43:54 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 171 times, last viewed: 2016-11-26 09:58:55 PST (-0800)