Observation 92195: Hydnum L.
When: 2012-04-07
Herbarium specimen reported

Proposed Names

56% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: very fragile and small

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

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collection..
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2012-04-08 09:54:58 PDT (-0700)

I don’t know if anyone is working on Hydnums right now, so if you manage to save it, I’d try an e-mail to Lorelei Norvell first and ask where it should be sent and stored until somebody wants to use it.

It seems like no one in North America has bothered with this genus since the 80’s.. In Mycotaxon 28(2) 1987, Harrison & Grund presented a preliminary key to Hydnum. I’ll write it down here to show how the worst kind of confusing keys can look like – but it’s also adding a few more species names. Just don’t try to use the key based on colours and cap sizes..
………………………….

1. Pileus tan, pinkish-cinnamon, or dull orange………………………2
1. Pileus white to creamy with tints of tan………………………….5

2. Pileus convex, color pinkish cinnamon to apricot-buff; spores 6-7 × 7-8.5µm……………H. repandum
2. Pileus usually under 7 cm; rusty-orange…………………………..3

3. Spores 6-7 × 7-8.5µm…………………………………H. rufescens
3. Spores larger, pileus variably colored……………………………4

4. Pileus tan to rusty-orange, umbilicate; spores 6-7.5 × 8-9.5µm……………………………..H. umbilicatum
4. Pileus color similar to H. repandum; spores 6-9.5 × 7-10(11)µm……………………….H. washingtonianum

5. Pileus usually over 6 cm, surface viscid; late fall species; spores 3.5-5 × 6-7µm……….H. albomagnum
5. Pileus smaller; surface dry; summer species……………………….6

6. Pileus rarely up to 7 cm, spores 3-4 × 4-6µm……………..H. albidum
6. Pileus 3-9 cm or smaller, spores 6-7 × 7-8.5µm.. H. repandum var. album

thanks everyone
By: Britney Ramsey (Riverdweller)
2012-04-08 08:18:07 PDT (-0700)

I will dry this if it’s possible. There were only the three tiny ones clustered together.
This section of Snow Peak contains many parent trees and some of the biggest standing Western hemlock and fir I’ve ever seen in OR.

who shall I send it to?

A very interesting collection!
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2012-04-08 01:18:54 PDT (-0700)

Do try to get it dried and save it. The genus Hydnum is complicated and poorly understood, and many more collections and sequences are needed to sort them out.
The naming of the species is not going to be easy.

I wonder if this could be the true Hydnum albidum described by Peck?
He chose to separate it from repandum because it was very small and slender, and the spores smaller (subglobose, 4-5 microns). Nobody seems to know how to interprete that name. I’m not sure what the true umbilicatum should look like either..

A year ago I gathered all Hydnum sequences I could find and tried to make sense of them. I found it very difficult, but it looks like a few new species need to be described, and you probably have a lot more to add from North America:

Scope
By: Matt Sherman (Shermanii)
2012-04-07 22:12:36 PDT (-0700)

Try checking it out under the scope

yes, i have it
By: Britney Ramsey (Riverdweller)
2012-04-07 19:43:48 PDT (-0700)

It’s in the fridge, but it’s very thin and fragile, not sure how long it will last.

I can’t find anything other than those two species either…
By: Matt Sherman (Shermanii)
2012-04-07 19:09:32 PDT (-0700)

sorry.
Interesting find though. Did you collect it?

keys that include more than two species?
By: Britney Ramsey (Riverdweller)
2012-04-07 18:00:36 PDT (-0700)

Does anyone have keys to Hydnum that include more than just Hydnum repandum and Hydnum umbilicatum?

Created: 2012-04-07 17:55:18 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2012-04-08 08:43:46 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 248 times, last viewed: 2016-10-30 06:17:53 PDT (-0700)
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