Observation 93417: Lycogala epidendrum (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr.

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re: re: Daniel
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2012-05-04 09:42:15 CDT (-0400)

1st comment:

This observation appears to show Lycoperdon helping to break down a plastic bag.

2nd comment:

I’m noting the fact this observation is growing on an obviously degraded plastic bag, apparently containing a pair of jeans (see Edward’s note). Cotton fiber is often the source of nutrients for some fungi…

I agree with (this part of) your second comment. I questioned your first, specifically drawing the potentially hasty conclusion that the most visible fungus (much less any fungus present in the vicinity of this bag) was responsible for the apparent degradation of the plastic, a lofty claim to be making from a few pictures. as per Eduardo’s latest comment, we know that the bags are biodegradable. at best, the fungi pictured (or not pictured) are facilitating or hastening the decomposition of this far less recalcitrant, biodegradable material. so are a wide variety of other microorganisms as well, no doubt.

if you’re interested in plastic degradation mediated by fungi, you might want to look into Scott Strobel’s work with Pestalotiopsis microspora.

http://aem.asm.org/content/77/17/6076

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By: Eduardo A. Esquivel Rios (Eduardo27)
2012-05-03 20:14:30 CDT (-0400)

Actually, in Panama is common use a bio-degradable plastics bags

interestingly they also found recently a mould that can easily break down plastic
By: Jonathan M
2012-05-03 20:07:53 CDT (-0400)
I disagree, Danny. I’m not assuming anything.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-05-03 19:11:26 CDT (-0400)

I’m noting the fact this observation is growing on an obviously degraded plastic bag, apparently containing a pair of jeans (see Edward’s note). Cotton fiber is often the source of nutrients for some fungi, just as some fungi capture nematodes for augmented dietary nutrients. Do you question Paul Stamets grew Pleurotus ostreatus on a copy of his book? Stamets presented similar photographic evidence in The Mushroom Cultivator.

As for tolerance for disturbed or polluted habitats, check Alfred B. Gore’s “Environmental Research at the Leading Edge.” This documents many toxins being degraded by fungi. Pleurotus ostreatus is one of many known to do that.

re: Daniel
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2012-05-03 16:47:52 CDT (-0400)

that’s assuming a lot. tolerance for disturbed or polluted habitats oughtn’t be confused with affinity or ability to decompose. many, many factors would need considering before any credibility could be given to the speculation that this fungus is responsible for the apparent decomposition of this plastic bag. if it is being decomposed by something, the puffball/slime mold may or may not be producing the enzymes responsible.

Amazon Mycorenewal Project folks originally had a mind to call any fungus growing within a given radius of petroluem pollution “petrophyllic,” implying that the very presence of fungi at a polluted site was somehow evidence in and of itself of fungal remediation in action. the group later adopted the word “petrotolerant,” as seen in the following two species lists:

http://mushroomobserver.org/species_list/show_species_list/183
http://mushroomobserver.org/species_list/show_species_list/182

though this term is used very liberally.

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By: Eduardo A. Esquivel Rios (Eduardo27)
2012-05-03 14:31:31 CDT (-0400)

Yes the plastic bag contain a old jeans and may be thrashed a month ago in a backyards farm

Important observation, I think.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-05-03 13:06:46 CDT (-0400)

This observation appears to show Lycoperdon helping to break down a plastic bag, which is shown fracturing and cracking. Was the bag on top of wood, perhaps? If not, this could be a helpful answer to dealing with plastic bag waste.

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By: Eduardo A. Esquivel Rios (Eduardo27)
2012-04-27 13:06:58 CDT (-0400)

A small puff-ball fungi growing in old plastic bag

Created: 2012-04-27 13:03:32 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2012-05-04 13:28:49 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 155 times, last viewed: 2016-02-20 14:37:45 CST (-0500)
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