Observation 94726: Gymnopilus P. Karst.
When: 2012-05-15
No herbarium specimen

Notes: A cluster of baby Gymnopilus (maybe luteofolius?) growing within a fallen pine log.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


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from Alan’s cited Gymnopilus paper…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2012-05-16 11:54:21 CDT (-0400)

“Not all red-coloured, squamulose Gymnopilus species in Australia are closely related. Those with persistent,
deep, wine-red colour which intensifies with age, and which have no annulus of any sort, such as Gymnopilus moabus…”

Another possibility. Save some of this, Kari, for when you get your scope!

BTW, always fun to see that matching colored pencil in the mix! ;)

Do you draw as well as carry these things about with you in the field? Apparently drawings of those micro features are quite useful for comparison.

For now, Gymnopilus sp. seems to be a best fit. Probably NOT luteofolius in OZ.

By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2012-05-16 06:39:55 CDT (-0400)

I always considered the reddest one in Australia to be G. purpuratus and the others to be less red. There is also G. dilepis. I am sure you have seen the paper on these species.

By: Kari (Kari)
2012-05-15 20:16:06 CDT (-0400)

…I neglected to say that this group of juvenile Gymnopilus were growing on another log, only a few metres from the still unidentified red Gymnopilus in photo #94724, and I assumed that these are young specimens of this particular species.

When I first spotted these juveniles, I thought they were much too red to be G. purpuratus – but I’m definitely a novice, and I’m happy to be corrected :o) Unfortunately my camera hasn’t managed to capture the true colour of these mushrooms, but they are definitely more rose-red than purple.

Created: 2012-05-14 22:51:21 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2012-05-15 10:30:00 CDT (-0400)
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