Observation 9670: Sarcodon scabrosus (Fr.) P. Karst.
When: 2008-08-19
Who: FunGuy
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Personal herbarium. 2 large pines within 25 feet of the specimen.

Images

17893
The cap is 5.5 inches across and the stem is fairly thick; 1.5 inches at the base growing to 2 inches at the thickest point. No gills, it is “sponge like”
17894
The cap is 5.5 inches across and the stem is fairly thick; 1.5 inches at the base growing to 2 inches at the thickest point. No gills, it is “sponge like”
17895
The cap is 5.5 inches across and the stem is fairly thick; 1.5 inches at the base growing to 2 inches at the thickest point. No gills, it is “sponge like”
17931
The cap is 5.5 inches across and the stem is fairly thick; 1.5 inches at the base growing to 2 inches at the thickest point. No gills, it is “sponge like”

Proposed Names

87% (4)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Would be more confident if there are pines around. Any particular smell/taste?

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Finally tasted
By: FunGuy
2008-08-22 13:48:22 UTC (+0000)

It was a bit mild with a very, very, faint hint of bitterness, tannic like. There was a another specimen within 2 feet of the original I photographed that matched this image http://americanmushrooms.com/... So I believe it is scabrosus.

Maybe another “scabrosus”
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2008-08-21 08:08:47 UTC (+0000)

What I have read recently, is that a mild form of scabrosus has been found in decidious woods (oak, beech), and it might be a non-described taxon. There are several other “pairs” of Sarcodon species that look alike, but grow in different habitats.

Did you taste this one?
By: Douglas Smith (douglas)
2008-08-20 23:57:04 UTC (+0000)

I found some like this in Saratoga Co. there last week. Looks about the same,
with the deep brown caps, scales, light grey-brown teeth, and stipe with a green-blue-grey base. But the ones I found were mild tasting, so I wonder if these are the same. Mostly what I see says S. scabrosus should be bitter, but it looks like a source from 1972 said it can be mild to bitter, although every source since then has stated these as bitter.

I didn’t have KOH at the time, so I didn’t get the color reactions to that, but that is used in Sarcodon id’s also.

…if it’s scabrosus, it should be bitter…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2008-08-20 16:12:24 UTC (+0000)

…and apparently scabrosus has anti-inflammatory properties, too. The joys of internet research!

Fertile fungal surface has teeth…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2008-08-20 16:05:43 UTC (+0000)

…not gills or pores. Just one of the ways that mushrooms maximize surface area for spore production. Taking a tiny taste of your fungal finds, chewing it then spitting it out can be very useful in the ID process. You cannot poison yourself this way, but can definitely taste whether a mushroom is mild or bitter or peppery or…?, important ID characters that you can get no other way.

Created: 2008-08-19 21:09:03 UTC (+0000)
Last modified: 2008-08-20 00:48:38 UTC (+0000)
Viewed: 47 times, last viewed: 2016-10-30 13:56:35 UTC (+0000)