Observation 97428: Amanita amerirubescens Tulloss nom. prov.
When: 2012-06-14
No herbarium specimen

Notes: This is my 1st post here. Please let me know if I didn’t do something correctly. Thank you.

6/14/12 info.:
I found this today w/in 15’ of what I think was a white pine tree, growing in
slightly red colored mulch, but I think in actuality growing in the soil and
tree root system then popping through the mulch as if ligniculous. Last year,
on 10/13/11 I found what was certainly an Amanita blusher by that same tree. It
is the non-yellow one in my right hand (funny, that was my work outfit I had
when I was foraging and found these mushrooms today), showing size.

In digging a little, I found the following pieces buried where the stipe was
see picture w/small pieces.

As pictured, the most obvious “blushing” is just on the stipe. Where the pileus
has pieces around the margin that seem cut off are primarily where the seem to
have broken off as the mushroom emerged. No bruising exists in those areas.

Other info.:
Gills seemed quite fragile (blowing on them to remove dirt broke some). Raw
taste & spit very flavorful, though I don’t know how to explain it if
distinctive. Odor not distinctive. Microwaved taste & spit wonderfully complex
and amazing, though not as fresh-fish-like as I remember from a definate Amanita
blusher I tasted last year. Picture showing the internal structure of the stipe
was taken ~5 minutes after cutting it.

Is this an Amanita rubescens var. rubescens? Is there anything else it might
possibly be? If so, please post any such possibilities.
Thank you so much.

6/15/12 additional info. in which I’m trying to compare it to an A. brunnescens & was told it isn’t A. brunnescens, but I post this additional info. both for additional identification information, and to hopefully get some feedback on why my way of trying to compare it to A. brunnescens is not correct:

I was advised an alternative possibility for Amanita rubescens var. rubescens is Amanita brunescens.

Here is my analysis of Amanita rubescens var. rubescens
vs. Amanita brunescens w/in the context of my specimen. Any advice is appreciated:

A. Basal bulb appears as rubescens (I took multiple pics of the basal bulb, rotating it for all side views:
There is no cleft/split present. However, there are two other theories:
1. I have an unusual specimen either without a cleft or having only a subtle one
I didn’t consider a cleft.
2. It somehow doesn’t show the cleft w/my photos or there is one that I’m not
noticing. Possibly the angles are deceiving. I’ll go get the actual specimen.
…okay, I see it is not what I would call cleft. I’ve attached additional pics
of the basal bulb.

B. Stipe discoloration appears to me much more a rubescens:
I see pink in it, but upon your comment I do detect some brown in both the photo
and actual specimen. Still, I’ll have to go with rubescens over brunescens,
particularly when looking at Michael Kuo’s pictures of brunescens that show what
I consider a straight brown with a slight reddish quality. From what I’ve read,
brunescens lacks pink in its discoloration.
Alternate theories:
1. Though containing pink should completely rule out brunescens, one could argue
rubescens shouldn’t contain any brown. However, to the best of my knowledge
this argument isn’t accurate to the differential identification of these
mushrooms. Please correct me if I’m wrong (e.g., if a rubescens can’t contain
any brown).

C. Pileus flesh discoloration:
Although there was no discoloration where parts of the pileus broke off as it
mushroomed out of the ground, where I cut a piece off yesterday is now showing
discoloration. The flesh is discolored a light pink (see attached photos).
This brings me back to rubescens. Confusingly, and maybe an amanita expert can
comment, the gills discolored yellow on the far right (see attached photos).
Alt. theory:
1. One could argue there’s a brown or darker color w/in the pink discoloration.
I personally could say maybe a salmon color. Anyway, “B.” above should apply to
this situation, I’d believe.

Also of note, the indoor lighting pictures are of a definite
(a # of experts concurred) blusher found last year by the same tree, but on
10/13/11.

Thanks everyone. I hope to hear from some people regarding this mushroom, and even the other Amanita I posted if possible.

Sam

Images

228193
228194
228195
228196
228197
228198
228199
228200
228201
228290
Indoor lighting pictures are of a definite (a # of experts concurred) blusher (sp?) found last year by the same tree, but on 10/13/11. See original description. Forgot to post this as additional info. (not presently to ID the 10/13/11 one to the species or subspecies).
228291
Indoor lighting pictures are of a definite (a # of experts concurred) blusher (sp?) found last year by the same tree, but on 10/13/11. See original description. Forgot to post this as additional info. (not presently to ID the 10/13/11 one to the species or subspecies).
228292
Indoor lighting pictures are of a definite (a # of experts concurred) blusher (sp?) found last year by the same tree, but on 10/13/11. See original description. Forgot to post this as additional info. (not presently to ID the 10/13/11 one to the species or subspecies).
228293
Indoor lighting pictures are of a definite (a # of experts concurred) blusher (sp?) found last year by the same tree, but on 10/13/11. See original description. Forgot to post this as additional info. (not presently to ID the 10/13/11 one to the species or subspecies).
228340
Note the cut stipe looks this color today.

Proposed Names

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Thank you Rod
By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2014-01-16 19:21:56 CST (-0500)

You’re a scholar and a gentleman.

Your apology is accepted.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-01-16 19:12:56 CST (-0500)

The matter is over.

Rod

Sorry Rod
By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2014-01-16 18:08:56 CST (-0500)

My bad. You did mention that the yellow lasts longer. http://mushroomobserver.org/29092?q=1g2xR

[Edited. requested for correction]
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-01-16 17:44:05 CST (-0500)

[text deleted]

I request that you clarify and correct your statement.

[text deleted]

Hi Sam
By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2014-01-16 16:55:37 CST (-0500)

It turns out there isn’t just one taxon comprising what we thought was A. amerirubescens, but it is a group of similar species we have placed under this umbrella. At this point you’ll need to figure out if your mushroom is A. amerirubescens species one, two, or three. Maybe Rod can help you with that.

[edited to remove an error on my part.]

Herbert Baker
By: Sam.Schaperow (Sam.Schaperow)
2012-06-18 23:51:50 CDT (-0400)

TY everyone for participating in helping w/this ID. Herbert, I saw you voted on it and changed the name to A. amerirubescens. I saw from RET’s comments that in our area (Northeastern USA), A. amerirubescens looks to be a better name that what I proposed.

My question to Herbert is, I see you voted at the “Could Be” level. As you consider A. amerirubescens, are you considering other mushrooms this could alternatively be?

Thank you so much.

Sam

I got your email, Sam.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2012-06-15 22:23:57 CDT (-0400)

Because you collected this specimen in eastern North America rather than Europe, I think that this is likely to be the common eastern N. American blusher, which has a provisional name that Herbert Baker has proposed here.

You can get data on both the European rubescens and the N. American “amerirubescens” here:

http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita+rubescens

http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita+amerirubescens

The specimen seems rather weathered. Amanita flavorubens can have the yellow pigment of the cap washed out by rain; however, the ring and stem often have yellow pigment in that species; and the yellow of the universal veil in flavorubens tends to persist longer than the yellow occasionally seen in the volva of young specimens of “amerirubescens”.

Your observation concerning missing clefts in the bulb seems accurate as does your observation concerning the pink coloring of the bruising reaction. Old bruising reactions tend to darken significantly.

R

Created: 2012-06-15 20:37:45 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2016-08-04 23:52:34 CDT (-0400)
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