Observation 98861: Amanita Pers. sect. Amanita
When: 2012-06-20
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: These were found in the northern section of the Turkey Creek Unit.
Caps were up to 3.5 cm across, slightly tacky, and with striations up to 5 mm.
There didn’t seem to be any real volva on the enlarged base.
The spores were whitish, inamyloid and ~ 7.7-9.5(10.0) X 6.3-8.2 microns. Q(ave.) = 1.16.

Proposed Names

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Comments

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You find the wierdest things…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-07 20:14:47 PST (-0800)

Helias was a daughter of the sun (Helios). For some offense to the gods, she was turned into a poplar tree and wept drops of amber.

Very best,

Rod

Well, I have certainly found a lot of stuff to think through.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-07 12:50:51 PST (-0800)

This has got to be of use in the long run. There are so many things without names.

Very best,

Rod

Yes, I agree Rod…
By: Ron Pastorino (Ronpast)
2015-11-07 10:45:44 PST (-0800)

we don’t need another “flavo-”, etc.
My suggestion was just a quick off the wall idea when I saw your “Sundrop” reference. It is a nice metaphorical image when applied to a flower(or mushroom?) The “drop” part I guess is more open for interpretation when trying to Latinize it, although since there are no literal Sundrops, one may have some literary leeway.

One thing I don’t want to lose…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-07 10:23:06 PST (-0800)

by reference to Oenothera I was aiming at the cap color of this species without creating another flavo- or xantho-. So the puzzle is “sun” and “drop” and “light yellow” all embedded or implied.

Very best,

Rod

Uh-oh.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-07 09:48:45 PST (-0800)

Now you’ve done it, my friend. :)

I think I have heard the phrase “The Greeks have a word for it.” The diversity of nouns in Greek and Latin can be quite large. Many words for subtle variations in concepts/things. A drop of dew, a drop of rain, a drop that has spotted something, a drop as a shape of an earring, a drop of medicine, a piece of candy, the output of distillation (your “stilla”), etc., etc. Should I feel forced to decide what some ancient Englishman/woman meant when they first uttered “sundrop”?

Now I have a project.

Incidentally, may I recommend Brown’s Composition of Scientific Words (Smithsonian Inst.) and Stearn’s Botanical Latin? Great reading. Also there are the recommendations in the International Code of Nomenclature that governs plants, fungi, etc. I see that together we have lifted a lid on a miniature version of Pandora’s [linguistic] box.

I’ll set aside some time to play around with words.

Very best,

Rod

Rod, I like the “Sundrop” analogy.
By: Ron Pastorino (Ronpast)
2015-11-07 07:37:16 PST (-0800)

How about a direct transliteration to Latin, which according to my google search would be something like Amanita solstilla?

How about Amanita oenothera?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-07 07:04:23 PST (-0800)

Oenothera is a genus of wildflowers native to eastern North America with flowers having a similar yellow. One common name for plants in this family is “Sundrop,” which I rather like for this species. Another common name is “evening primrose.”

Very best,

Rod

I also appreciate the spore measurements.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-06 19:59:12 PST (-0800)

The spore measurements indicate that the species can be separated from the russuloides-like taxa by spore size and shape.

Very best,

Rod

Thanks Rod,
By: Ron Pastorino (Ronpast)
2015-11-06 18:15:16 PST (-0800)

that’s quite a interesting range for an undescribed species. Look forward to seeing a name for them.

Hello, Ron.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-11-06 17:54:14 PST (-0800)

This turns out to be the new species about which I wrote a little on observation #142360.

Thanks you very much for this interesting material.

Very best,

Rod

Thank you.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2012-07-01 20:59:39 PDT (-0700)

R

Rod, yes I noticed that piece also.
By: Ron Pastorino (Ronpast)
2012-07-01 20:21:29 PDT (-0700)

If you go to full size on either photo, the stalk is fairly rough and that piece looks a little like a larger flake or tear off of the stem. But there is a vague line of demarcation also.
I’ll package these up also and send them to you in a couple of days.

This is interesting.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2012-07-01 19:47:07 PDT (-0700)

There is a piece of white membranous material on the top of the larger bulb in the first pic. This could be a piece of a partial veil or a piece of a volval limb…from the positioning, I’d guess the first. But that is just a guess. The spore size is a bit suggestive of A. xylinivolva, which could lose its partial veil, although it usually has a distinct volval limb on the bulb. I’d be interested in seeing the herbarium specimen. The spores do seem too round (Q too low) for “sp-S01”.

R

Created: 2012-07-01 14:47:20 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2012-07-01 14:52:02 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 143 times, last viewed: 2016-10-24 04:39:09 PDT (-0700)
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