Notes:
Many of these found in the middle of a grassy area, 30 feet or more from surrounding woods (oak/hickory).

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ret
82% (1)
Based on chemical features: This is the first collection from which we will build a species concept for Amanita waterlooensis.

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

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The sequences that we have derived are now in GenBank.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-05-09 09:18:01 CDT (-0400)

We may still make some small changes.

Very best,

Rod

I’m really looking forward to seeing how things turn out with nrLSU tree and…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-24 23:17:29 CDT (-0400)

with the spore size and shape.

One thing that is unfortunate is that waterlooensis has yet to provide a good sequence and unfragmented nrLSU or nrITS sequence.

Very best,

Rod

I should write…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2019-03-24 21:30:17 CDT (-0400)

“what appears to be rooseveltensis”, when referencing collections I have made in locations other than on the lawn separating the north-facing side of my home from a wooded area. I’ll continue to make collections, estimate spore dimensions, and preserve material.

I also have such data from species thought to be rooseveltensis.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-24 16:32:08 CDT (-0400)

I also have DNA from species thought to be rooseveltensis that does not match with DNA from rooseveltensis. I’ll have to explore this further, but I can’t do it right now. You’re right about that.

Very best,

Rod

The first specimen of coprinopsoides collected (with Bas and Jenkins in 1948)…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-24 16:08:19 CDT (-0400)

… has avg. spore length = 9.6 microns, avg. spore width = 6.9 microns, and average Q = 1.40.

R

Sounds good…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2019-03-24 10:53:08 CDT (-0400)

well, except that it’s even more work for you!

I have multiple spore photos representing rooseveltensis collections made on my lawns over the past few years (including one for which the L and W are significantly larger than average). Also, a few collections from other locations.

Estimate of work for initial explorations of spore size/shape issue:
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-24 10:42:49 CDT (-0400)

The only data available at this moment (given by average length, average width, and average Q are:

rooseveltensis: 9.9 7.8 1.27
sp-n52: 9.3 7.7 1.21

This leaves:

fragilis (Linas has the material)
sp-GSM04
coprinopsoides
batonrougensis
sp-AUS13
waterlooensis

I will try to check a few of these while the tree building algorithm is running (now 30.5% complete, but I’ll probably have to run it a second time for more resolution)

R

The next hypothesis to test is something like…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-24 10:30:34 CDT (-0400)

“Membership in the “Rooseveltensis branch” is predictive of spore shape/size in some way."

R

Good suggestions, David.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-24 07:55:44 CDT (-0400)

There is one recent, large, nrLSU-based, consensus tree that groups all of the following in one branch: fragilis, “sp-N52,” rooseveltensis, RET 682-3, “sp-GSM04_,” coprinopsoides, batonrougensis, “sp-AUS13,” and waterlooensis. So it is possible that they have a common ancestor. I will see if I can learn more concerning your hypothesis.

Interesting idea, David.

Very best,

Rod

A. batonrougensis…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2019-03-23 23:09:30 CDT (-0400)

is another of these similar-looking species obs 281566. Is this indicative of convergent evolution? Or does it make any sense to suppose that a single ancestor is currently evolving into molecularly distinct but otherwise similar taxa?

Also, may it be useful to encourage collectors who contribute material for study to also include samples of spores? If there’s more than one fruit body constituting an observation, then maybe spores from one could be collected onto foil.

Yes, I have also found such species more OR less similar to rooseveltensis
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-23 11:39:15 CDT (-0400)

in color and habit; but not having the narrower spores.

One thing that would be interesting (when we “double” the number of sequenced species in the Vaginatae) is to see if species with ellipsoid to elongate spores have repeatedly evolved in separate clades. I am inclined to think that is true, but I have not gathered the data to support the hypothesis.

Rod

Rooseveltensis caps…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2019-03-23 11:12:06 CDT (-0400)

often have grains or little clumps of soil adhering to the cap, eg. obs 177267 .

I have found examples with similar appearance to rooseveltensis, but with globose/subglobose spores obs 288586.

Working on the spores for this and several other “newbies.”
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-23 10:34:03 CDT (-0400)

In the present case, we have one collection. It is interesting that the ridges between striations are pallid. Also that the center of the cap seems to have some sort of detritus on it.

Very best,

Rod

Cap looks…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2019-03-23 07:51:47 CDT (-0400)

just like rooseveltensis, and the habitat is the same as where I have found rooseveltensis. Is the spore shape known for this one? Hopefully, short of sequencing, there will be some way to recognize. The seemingly pigmented basal volva that Rod asked about looks like a candidate.

Would you say that the more or less pale ochraceous color of the universal veil…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-21 16:29:34 CDT (-0400)

is genetically determined or caused by staining from (say) the soil?

Very best,

Rod

We have an entire nrITS sequence …
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-20 17:02:45 CDT (-0400)

…and at least 491 characters of the adjacement (5’) piece of nrLSU. As noted in the past we also have a disjoint piece of nrLSU that is 703 characters long. At this time we do not have the data to connect the two pieces of nrLSU.

We have not found close matches in GenBank. Still working.

Very best,

Rod

Hello, Patrick. I’m hoping your spring is moving along well.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-20 16:32:47 CDT (-0400)

Very best,

Rod

It seems we’ve learned a few things over the years.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-03-20 16:31:37 CDT (-0400)

While there are ambiguities in it, I think we have a fairly good nrITS sequence for the material of the voucher for this observation.

I hope we will have more to say soon.

Rod

We got a little piece of the nrLSU sequence from this species; however,…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2016-04-26 12:28:42 CDT (-0400)

it is very distant from the part of LSU that we are usually able to obtain.

Very best,

Rod

We are beginning to layout the next six months or so of sequencing planning.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-02-01 17:02:58 CST (-0500)

“Old species 17” and “rooseveltensis” (not on the website yet) and other species with average spores ellipspoid are going onto the agenda. We’ll see what we can get.

Very best,

Rod

The habitat for this obs…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-01-31 22:40:01 CST (-0500)

is pretty much identical to where I have made many collections of a gray grisette near my home. Mowed lawn 20-30 feet from a wood border with young oak and one large Shagbark Hickory. obs 138805

Our success with DNA has been partial…so far.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-01-31 11:31:15 CST (-0500)

Sometimes the “proposed fungal bar code” (nrITS) gene appears in multiple copies within one fruiting body (indicating hybridization within a biological species).

This is particularly common in some amanitas. So difficulties in getting a complete and coherent (unambiguous) nrITS sequence may not be due to drying methods or processing problems. In cases of “unhomogenized” nrITS, the issue is inherent in the genome itself. Don’t drop the drying temperature too much…maybe around 105-115 degrees F.

We’ve learned from Dr. Karen Hughes about bacterial cloning which can successfully segregate some of the individual versions of nrITS from within a sample of mixed copies of differing nrITS. Unfortunately, it is not easy to find a lab/person that/who is both knowledgeable in the process and available and willing to take up an “after hours” job with amanitas.

Very best,

Rod

Thanks Patrick,
By: groundhog
2014-07-07 12:58:00 CDT (-0400)

This material has been received and accessioned to Rod’s herbarium. We have scheduled it for DNA sequencing.
Thanks,
Naomi

Thank you, Patrick.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-06-12 18:35:00 CDT (-0400)

Rod

Ready to send
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2014-06-12 14:54:12 CDT (-0400)

This has been dried & ready to pack for sending tonight.

I would be very interested in seeing the photographed material.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-06-12 10:24:06 CDT (-0400)

At the moment, we are working our way through several species of sect. Vaginatae with regard to some basic sequencing. The results are very revealing as Naomi and I have mentioned on MO. We are finding that concepts for identification of temporary code numbers can include cryptic taxa, which is not surprising since decades of collecting have yielded many temporary codes, but have not deeply enriched the taxonomy of the section. The molecular methods are changing the understanding.

Because of we are continually discovering that our provisional concepts need revision, we are being as thorough as possible…trying to get sequences for all material in the Roosevelt herbarium that was thought (at any time in the past!) to belong within the scope of a temporary code or provisional name. I don’t see another way to do this as well as we can on a first pass through the herbarium (now approaching 6000 amanitas).

I hope folks can be patient with us. As you know we have on-going projects related to other sections of the genus in addition to the Vaginatae.

Very best,

Rod

Sample dried and ready to send
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2014-06-12 09:52:31 CDT (-0400)

I found another one deeper in the woods, more brownish grey. Collected it also, but took no photographs of it.