When: 2015-07-02

Collection location: Fredericksburg , Virginia, USA [Click for map]

Who: amp244

No specimen available

Notes:
I went outside of my home and located a pair of bolete-like mushrooms sharing a common base. They were very dark in color and were jet black at the base. The cap stem and pore surface were a charcoal black color with a little bit of white/gray on the stipe. When damaged the stipe quickly bruised a vibrant reddish/orange color that soon faded to black after about 5 minutes.

I went inside and used the Audubon Field guide to locate a black bolete and was prompted to investigate the Black Velvet Bolete (Tylopilus Alboater) but was questioning whether or not this was my find as my mushrooms did not have the velvety cap. I was doing further research online and a Wikipedia article on Alboater listed Tylopilus Griseocarneus as a lookalike that could be distinguished by its dry, non-velvety cap and redish/orange staining upon damaging. Upon further research of Griseocarneus I have come to the conclusion that I have found Tylopilus Griseocarneus

I have also uploaded a video to youtube showing the bruising reaction:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itCTcgoOl74

Images

IMG_1587.JPG
The stipes broke from their base when I picked them
IMG_1588.JPG
Cap margin
IMG_1589.JPG
Pores
IMG_1590.JPG
The base
IMG_1592.JPG
Staining
IMG_1596.JPG
Staining

Proposed Names

89% (2)
Recognized by sight: I went outside of my home and located a pair of bolete-like mushrooms sharing a common base. They were very dark in color and were jet black at the base. The cap stem and pore surface were a charcoal black color with a little bit of white/gray on the stipe. When damaged the stipe quickly bruised a vibrant reddish/orange color that soon faded to black after about 5 minutes.
Used references: I went inside and used the Audubon Field guide to locate a black bolete and was prompted to investigate the Black Velvet Bolete (Tylopilus Alboater) but was questioning whether or not this was my find as my mushrooms did not have the velvety cap. I was doing further research online and a Wikipedia article on Alboater listed Tylopilus Griseocarneus as a lookalike that could be distinguished by its dry, non-velvety cap and redish/orange staining upon damaging. Upon further research of Griseocarneus I have come to the conclusion that I have found Tylopilus Griseocarneus.

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Definitely T. griseocarneus
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2015-07-02 23:27:06 CDT (-0400)

because the stipe is reticulated. T. alboater has a smooth stipe… I occasionally find this species in the NJ Pine Barrens.