Observation 254665: Fungi Bartl.

When: 2016-10-01

Collection location: Fauquier Co., Virginia, USA [Click for map]

Who: SMoubray

No specimen available

Notes:
Mixed forest of oak, poplar, hickory, beech and ash.
Very tiny but when crushed had a mushroom smell. Growing from a stick.

Species Lists

Images

image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg
Growing on same stick
image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg

Proposed Names

30% (2)
Recognized by sight
63% (2)
Recognized by sight
28% (1)
Recognized by sight
28% (1)
Recognized by sight
45% (2)
Recognized by sight
28% (1)
Recognized by sight: obs 280425
51% (3)
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Here is something else to consider
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2017-03-23 18:23:24 CST (-0600)

http://mushroomobserver.org/98971?q=3P2Q

Not that I am trying to draw any conclusions!

Martin, about those rhizomorphs…
By: SMoubray
2017-03-09 02:23:31 CST (-0600)

I did find Armillaria gallica in that area on 10/20/16, so about ten days after I originally posted this observation.

Do you think it could be a polypore on mycena?
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2016-10-20 06:40:56 CDT (-0500)

…or is this just crazed speculation?

Sample
By: SMoubray
2016-10-19 21:17:39 CDT (-0500)

I did. It’s pretty dried up. I didn’t try to preserve it. Just brought it home. It’s been rained on and sun beaten. But yes. :)

Now I think it is something else
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2016-10-19 19:22:11 CDT (-0500)

Black rhizomorphs are on the log, but they are not what is seen in your details. I saw something similar and did not photograph it. Typical example of being too busy to take pictures of the fungi while on a fungal walk. Sigh. I think this is a secondary fungus on mycena. The bunched habit of the second photo supports this. Perhaps the caps were removed by dessication or by the grazing of an insect – the stems were then open for colonization by our friend. Last two photos are really interesting – a polypore? Did you keep a sample of this?

The black ‘shoestring’ rhizomorphs
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2016-10-02 16:27:44 CDT (-0500)

are frequently seen on old wood throughout the year, having run under the bark the previous season. Today I say them poking straight out of a log that reminded me of xylaria. But the rhizomorphs were elsewhere on the log in typical parallel (to the log) construction. These look like the same except that they are alive and forming fruit bodies from the tips of the rhizomorphs. I have never seen this before, so I may be crazy. If not armillaria, then maybe another fungus has colonized the shoelaces and is fruiting at the tips. The fruiting looks a bit like some type of polypore…, Armillaria mycelium often glows in the dark, so if you brought it home, you might check on it about 10 o’clock!

Created: 2016-10-01 22:02:33 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2018-03-27 16:22:12 CST (-0600)
Viewed: 234 times, last viewed: 2019-11-14 00:30:53 CST (-0600)
Show Log