When: 2018-05-20

Collection location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA [Click for map]

Who: andrew (aboczjr)

Specimen available

Notes:
Found in my front yard among leaf debris. You can see the volva in some of the pictures still in the ground.

Images

Proposed Names

53% (1)
Recognized by sight
-46% (2)
Recognized by sight
ret
-55% (1)
Recognized by sight: See links in comments, below.
ret
82% (1)
Based on chemical features: See comments. nrLSU sequence obtained.

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
The DNA from the voucher material for this observation provides an ID—-Amanita rooseveltensis.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2019-09-11 21:34:04 PDT (-0700)

As usual for this species, we cannot derive an nrITS (proposed barcode gene) from
the voucher material of this observation; however, we were able to obtain a small terminal fragment of nrITS and the initial segment of nrLSU up to a total of 1,466 characters.

The identification is definitive compared with all the previous sequences we have derived for rooseveltensis.

Thanks for the dried material. This is the first rooseveltensis we have confirmed for Georgia.

Very best,

Rod

I failed to say that we will pursue identification.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-06-17 14:26:28 PDT (-0700)

Very best,

Rod

The voucher material for this observation has been accessioned in our herbarium.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-06-17 14:16:58 PDT (-0700)

Thank you for sending the material.

It is too bad that you were unable to extract the bottom of the stem along with the volval sack.

Very best,

Rod and Mary Tulloss

Thank you for your email, Andrew.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-25 21:36:59 PDT (-0700)

It looks like the dried material will start with being sampled for DNA sequencing.

Very best,

Rod

Thank you for your email, Andrew.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-25 21:36:54 PDT (-0700)

It looks like the dried material will start with being sampled for DNA sequencing.

Very best,

Rod

There’s a species for which I don’t think I have a photo … A. petersenii.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-22 19:36:31 PDT (-0700)

We’ll need to check that out.

The tree is an oak. There’s probably pieces of old acorns around it in the grass, etc.

Very best,

Rod

re: Rod Tulloss
By: andrew (aboczjr)
2018-05-21 09:59:52 PDT (-0700)

> How deeply was the stem inserted in the soil? 30%? 50%? Other?
The stem was around 20-30% inserted.

> …have very pronounced and hard umbo’s
The umbo did have a hard leathery feeling. I didn’t try to cut it.

> You may want to check this descriptions
I will compare later

> I would like to examine this specimen if possible
I have collected it out of my front yard and it is now in my dryer.

> What trees do you have in your front yard?
Only one tree and I’m not sure what it is. I can provide some pictures that should help with ID.

> If another one appears, can you dig down and get the bottom of the stem?
Yes. The volva didn’t appear very large from what I could tell, but I will collect the volva if I see another one.

If another one appears, can you dig down and get the bottom of the stem?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-21 09:11:28 PDT (-0700)

The bottom of the stem should be enclosed in a rather large, white, membranous volval sac. If I am right about this critter the bottom of the volva may even have a pointed root below the sack. I am very curious to know what the very bottom of the stem is like.

R

What trees do you have in your front yard?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-21 09:08:41 PDT (-0700)

R

Do you have a dryer?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-21 09:07:56 PDT (-0700)

I would like to examine this specimen if possible. I’m sure the DNA would be very interesting as well as other characteristics.

Very best,

Rod Tulloss

How deeply was the stem inserted in the soil? 30%? 50%? Other?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-21 09:01:03 PDT (-0700)

This looks a great deal like some species that I have been found to be new recently. It reminds me of Amanita semiobruta.

Amanita semiobruta is in a small goup with stems that extended deeply into the ground and have very pronounced and hard umbo’s. Even with a very sharp razor blade, cutting vertically into the umbo requires some effort because the umbo is so hard.

You may want to check this descriptions (completenesso variable at the moment..sorry):

http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita%20semiobruta

http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita%20penetratrix

http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita%20penetrans

Up to now, I’ve known semiobruta only from Jon Shaffer’s collections from Newton Co., Missouri.

Very best,

Rod