Name: Craterellus fallax A.H. Sm.
Most Confident Observations:
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Copyright © 2011 Hamilton (ham)
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Copyright © 2011 Dave W (Dave W)
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Copyright © 2013 AJ (j7u)
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Copyright © 2014 Eva Skific (Evica)
Version: 11
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First person to use this name on MO: Alan Rockefeller
Editors: Jason Hollinger, Erlon, matthewfoltz

Nomenclature:

Rank: Species

Status: Accepted

Name: Craterellus fallax

Author: A.H. Sm.

Citation: Michigan Bot. 7: 153 (1968)

Classification:

Domain: Eukarya

Kingdom: Fungi

Phylum: Basidiomycota

Class: Agaricomycetes

Order: Cantharellales

Genus: Craterellus

Lifeform:
Notes on Taxonomy: [Edit]

http://www.bio.utk.edu/...

(March 2010)

Abstract- Phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences of members of the Craterellus cornucopioides complex (Black Trumpet mushrooms) supports the taxonomic separation of Craterellus fallax apart from C. cornucopioides, with which it has been synonymized in the past. Examination of Pinus virginiana ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tips and sequence comparison with other insufficiently identified environmental sequences from roots of Tsuga, Quercus, and possibly Castanea supports a broad host range in North America for the ECM symbiont C. fallax. This is the first molecular confirmation of an ECM symbiont with P. virginiana, which associates with a wide diversity of ECM fungi, and the first report of a Cantharellaceae symbiont with this tree, an eastern North American two-needled pine. Three unique species in the C. cornucopioides complex are recovered based on phylogenetic analysis: C. fallax, C. cornucopioides, and an unidentified Craterellus species similar to C. fallax but smaller in stature with smaller spores.

H.B

Cantharellus fallax has been shown to be a distinct species, separate from Cantharellus cornucopioides and Cantharellus konradii (Matheny et al. 2010). Dahlman et al. based their synonimization on data from only one genetic locus (nLSU) which has later been shown to not be sufficient on its own for separating closely related taxa within Cantharellus (Foltz et al. 2013). Matheny et al. find molecular support from higher resolution ITS data, and morpholigical evidence that C. fallax uniquely produces a pink spore print, to re-instate Craterellus fallax as a valid species.

Matheny, PB. Austin, EA. Birkebak, JM. Wolfenbarger, AD. 2010. Craterellus fallax, a Black Trumpet mushroom from eastern North America with a broad host range. Mycorrhiza. 20: 569-575. DOI: 10.1007/s00572-010-0326-2

Foltz MJ, Perez KE, Volk TJ. 2013. Molecular phylogeny and morphology reveals three new species of Cantharellus within 20 meters of one another in western Wisconsin, USA. Mycologia. 105(2): 447-461. DOI: 10.3852/12-181

These notes come from Craterellus fallax Smith when it was merged with this name:

According to MushroomExpert.com:


“Three species, Craterellus cornucopioides, Craterellus fallax, and Craterellus konradii, have been separated on the basis of geographical distribution and the color of the spore-bearing surface. Dahlman et al. synonymize all of these species, finding no significant genetic variance. The name Craterellus cornucopioides takes precedence according to the rules governing botanical names.”


C. konradii was also separated based on color (yellow/orange vs. black), but many examples have since been found of the the two color forms growing in the same cluster. See observation 2828 for an example of the yellow/orange form.

Update (6/6/2013): Cantharellus fallax has been shown to be a distinct species, separate from Cantharellus cornucopioides and Cantharellus konradii (Matheny et al. 2010). Dahlman et al. based their synonimization on data from only one genetic locus (nLSU) which has later been shown to not be sufficient on its own for separating closely related taxa within Cantharellus (Foltz et al. 2013). Matheny et al. find molecular support from higher resolution ITS data, and morpholigical evidence that C. fallax uniquely produces a pink spore print, to re-instate Craterellus fallax as a valid species.

Matheny, PB. Austin, EA. Birkebak, JM. Wolfenbarger, AD. 2010. Craterellus fallax, a Black Trumpet mushroom from eastern North America with a broad host range. Mycorrhiza. 20: 569-575. DOI: 10.1007/s00572-010-0326-2

Foltz MJ, Perez KE, Volk TJ. 2013. Molecular phylogeny and morphology reveals three new species of Cantharellus within 20 meters of one another in western Wisconsin, USA. Mycologia. 105(2): 447-461. DOI: 10.3852/12-181

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Created: 2007-07-26 04:09:52 EDT (-0400) by Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
Last modified: 2018-03-15 22:53:50 EDT (-0400) by Jason Hollinger (jason)
Viewed: 720 times, last viewed: 2018-09-20 17:46:25 EDT (-0400)
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