When: 2014-05-31

Collection location: Culpeper Co., Virginia, USA [Click for map]

38.53°N 78.15°E [Click for map]

Who: Penny Firth (pfirth)

No specimen available

Notes:
This was like “living rock” fruiting under the upturned roots of a fallen tree. Each “plate” was less than a cm in diameter.

Species Lists

Images

Base of fallen tree on which this organism was fruiting.
Base of fallen tree on which this organism was fruiting.
This is a crossection of one of the “plates.” The whitish surface is just visible. The “body” seemed to have layers. This was 8 mm across.
This is a crossection of one of the “plates.” The whitish surface is just visible. The “body” seemed to have layers. This was 8 mm across.
This is a crossection of one of the “plates.” The whitish surface is just visible. The “body” seemed to have layers. This was 8 mm across.
This is what the surface of the fruiting body looked like: relatively smooth texture.

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

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I am
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-06-05 18:43:18 CDT (-0500)

SOOOOOOO enjoying this exchange.

That’s cardboard, not typing paper
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2014-06-05 12:12:24 CDT (-0500)

Come on, give me some credit! (Of course these days I’m lazy and just clamp it on with one hand, easier to center the darned thing that way…)

Thank you Jason! Will try to
By: Penny Firth (pfirth)
2014-06-05 12:05:05 CDT (-0500)

section one this weekend. I have a low-end dissecting scope and am figuring out how to get a good photo through one of the oculars. Jason appears to have his camera connected to the scope with typing paper and duct tape. I also have baling twine and chewing gum available. Should be a fun project!

try sectioning one
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2014-06-05 00:21:21 CDT (-0500)

and posting the results

Don’t give me a reputation to live up to!
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2014-06-04 23:55:14 CDT (-0500)

The main thing in this photo looks unlichenized to me, sorry. …But the bright green granular stuff in the lower right does! Maybe one of those weird unidentifiable sterile Biatora, e.g. B. chrysantha.

Virtually all the lichens in North America consort with green algae or cyanobacteria — i.e. grass green to dark green. The one exception is Trentepohlia, which can itself be golden to reddish, but rarely imparts more than a faint yellowish or “warm brownish” hue to the lichen it grows in.

Jason Hollinger
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-06-03 22:34:10 CDT (-0500)

is one of the most prolific additions to MO. Look up contributors.

Thank you! Is Jason
By: Penny Firth (pfirth)
2014-06-03 21:33:42 CDT (-0500)

someone who frequents MO? Not sure how to get him to look at it. I can get material next weekend, and more photos, if desirable.

Need to have Jason
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-06-03 10:58:04 CDT (-0500)

Hollinger look at this one, Penny. May be a lichen, rather than a fungi. Actually, they are similar: lichens are fungi and algae in symbiosis. Each “rock” has a rose-tint to it, suggesting a possible algae to me at least.

A fungi growing in the same environment would tend to take over the surface shown.

Created: 2014-06-02 20:48:59 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2014-06-08 20:41:29 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 94 times, last viewed: 2019-07-13 16:41:08 CDT (-0500)
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