Notes:
Growing in leaf litter near Fagus grandifolia, Tsuga canadensis, Pinus strobus and Acer rubrum. Cup tapers into a stem. All structures inamyloid. Paraphyses straight and unbranched. Asci operculate, unitinicate and 8-spored (uniseriate). Excipulum composed of irregular cellular elements. Spores smooth. Spore measurements from Piximetre: (14.1) 14.9 – 17.7 (18.6) × (9.4) 9.6 – 10.2 (11) µm, Q = (1.5) 1.52 – 1.7; N = 10, Me = 16.4 × 10.1 µm; Qe = 1.6
Individual spores: 16.23 × 10.15 µm, 15.40 × 10.15 µm, 17.56 × 10.23 µm, 16.93 × 10.18 µm, 16.96 × 10.07 µm, 18.58 × 11.01 µm, 14.11 × 9.55 µm, 15.14 × 9.59 µm, 17.73 × 10.21 µm, 14.91 × 9.38 µm

Species Lists

Images

IMG_5826.JPG
IMG_5831.JPG
DSC_6588 100x in Melzers.JPG
DSC_6591 Spore at 400x in Melzers.JPG
DSC_6593 400x in Melzers.JPG
DSC_6595 Base of ascus at 400x in Melzers.JPG
DSC_6635 40x in distilled water.JPG
DSC_6639 spore at 400x in distilled water.JPG

Proposed Names

29% (1)
Recognized by sight
60% (2)
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Tarzetta cupularis is the best match overall
By: Django Grootmyers (Heelsplitter)
2018-03-25 17:42:56 CDT (-0500)

but the spores are a bit too small. It seems that there are probably several species going under “cupularis” in North America.