Observation 230224: Poria sensu lato

Notes:

We’ve had quite a few tree falls of mature oaks and hickories in the last several years. Most of these trees were blown down, pulling up a root ball that elevates the trunk from the ground for many years. I’ve noticed a whitish curst on the lower sides and bottoms of many of the trees while the bark is still on. It’s an early colonizer along with Stereum ostrea and other bracket fungi. Unlike the brackets, the whitish crust causes the bark to loosen such that you can (with a knife and some effort) usually rip pieces of thick bark off, revealing moist degrading wood below. Today I took photos of three fallen trees, a Southern Red Oak (Quercus flacata) and two Northern Red Oaks (Q. rubra), capturing images of the crust in various states. The photos are in the order taken. No reaction to KOH.

Images

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2016-01-31__ga_KR-088.jpg
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bottom crust
2016-01-31__ga_KR-119.jpg

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Created: 2016-01-31 20:09:48 MST (-0700)
Last modified: 2016-02-01 18:43:21 MST (-0700)
Viewed: 46 times, last viewed: 2020-07-12 19:28:02 MST (-0700)
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