Notes:
in wood chips in springtime, recent temps near freezing at night

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Thanks everyone
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2016-04-12 03:00:18 CEST (+0200)

Yeah! Photography, taxonomy, and the great outdoors! Buy the best shiitakes you can and forget the rest…, unless they happen to be pristine, beautiful, fresh, chanterelles.

I agree with Terri
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2016-04-11 05:16:16 CEST (+0200)

This mushroom has an OK flavor but the texture is soft. I once cooked them with Agaricus arvensis which had by far, the better taste.

Great answer!
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2016-04-11 05:12:32 CEST (+0200)
Hi Martin and Judi
By: Terri Clements/Donna Fulton (pinonbistro)
2016-04-11 02:56:03 CEST (+0200)

Judi, I love photographing mushrooms then eating them! Martin, I find this one to be pretty boring with a mediocre taste. I’ve only had it twice but don’t think I’d bother trying it again.

Terri

Martin, I’m not a mycophagist at heart.
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2016-04-11 01:41:37 CEST (+0200)

I’d rather photograph the mushrooms I find than eat them… mostly for the reasons that you mentioned. And I have only found this species in urban/suburban settings in woodchips and areas frequented by people and pets. I have not read anywhere that these are choice edibles, but I am not an expert by any means. Perhaps someone in your local mycological society has knowledge in this area or maybe someone on MO will see you question and respond.

So Judi
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2016-04-11 00:53:50 CEST (+0200)

Do you consume these mushrooms? I have heard they are good, but I am never sure of the environment I find them in. Wood chips can be treated, though most are not. Most are near places that could be treated for weeds and /or pests or frequented by dogs. If I could find them in a clean area, I would definitely give them a try.

We had a very warm spell for a week recently, but now we are in an unseasonably cold period. I guess the mushrooms couldn’t stop themselves once they got started.

I do think that Spring - as far as mushrooms are concerned -
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2016-04-10 23:53:31 CEST (+0200)

is determined more by ground temps and weather variations than by an exact month. We have warm ground temperatures (55-65) already here but nights are still cold. I’ll start watching for these beautiful, robust mushrooms this coming week. They are one of my favorites.

Terri, Judi
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2016-04-10 21:12:02 CEST (+0200)

I have local posts of this species on 2011-05-05, 2011-05-12, 2012-05-06, and 2014-05-14. So you are right. According to my scant records, it is very early, practically a month earlier than my previous observations. These photos were taken by my son at the Adventure Park where he works, so there may have been more disturbance to the wood mulch in a way that encouraged early fruiting. The other 3 sites were less disturbed, but I am not assuming this to be the reason for the apparent early fruiting. When he described them the day before he took the photos, I suggested Agrocybe which can be this early or Leucoagaricus americanus which can’t. I was very suprised to see them this early. That is why I posted them. Other signs of spring that I have seen don’t seem particularly early, so this may not be directly attributable to global warming.

Mid-April is when this species fruits in my area —
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2016-04-10 20:15:46 CEST (+0200)

southern Missouri. Once it starts fruiting in a specific area it will dependably continue to fruit for a good two-weeks at the same site. If I’m not mistaken, Maryland may be in the same horticultural zone, i.e., Zone 6.

Hi Martin, is this earlier than normal for this species?
By: Terri Clements/Donna Fulton (pinonbistro)
2016-04-10 20:08:30 CEST (+0200)

Terri