Notes:
Growing on a hardwood stick. Asci bitunicate. Spores brown and mostly 3-septate without longitudinal septa. Spore measurements from Piximetre: (24.8) 25.8 – 30.2 (31.8) × (9.3) 10.2 – 11.8 (13.5) µm, Q = (2.2) 2.3 – 2.7 (3.2); N = 30, Me = 27.5 × 11 µm; Qe = 2.5
Individual spores: 25.74 × 10.61 µm, 26.92 × 11.79 µm, 25.68 × 10.74 µm, 25.82 × 11.49 µm, 26.39 × 10.23 µm, 26.86 × 11.17 µm, 30.35 × 11.98 µm, 28.86 × 11.16 µm, 28.25 × 10.05 µm, 25.96 × 11.00 µm, 24.76 × 10.37 µm, 28.52 × 11.60 µm, 26.30 × 10.37 µm, 30.40 × 11.24 µm, 27.23 × 11.44 µm, 27.95 × 10.46 µm, 26.70 × 11.01 µm, 29.67 × 11.71 µm, 28.24 × 12.92 µm, 26.08 × 10.61 µm, 27.87 × 11.50 µm, 25.96 x 10.60 µm, 26.11 × 10.07 µm, 26.05 × 11.25 µm, 26.82 × 10.31 µm, 31.85 × 13.51 µm, 27.25 × 10.69 µm, 30.20 × 9.31 µm, 26.35 × 10.98 µm, 30.15 × 10.92 µm

Species Lists

Images

DSCN9515.JPG
DSC_5418 100x in NH4OH (2 drops), phloxine (1 drop) and congo red (1 drop).JPG
DSC_5419 100x in NH4OH (2 drops), phloxine (1 drop) and congo red (1 drop.JPG
DSC_5421 Ascus with spores and other structures at 400x in NH4OH (2 drops), phloxine (1 drop) and congo red (1 drop.JPG
DSC_5436 Spores at 400x in NH4OH (2 drops), phloxine (1 drop) and congo red (1 drop.JPG
DSC_5444 Asci with spores and other structures at 400x in NH4OH (2 drops), phloxine (1 drop) and congo red (1 drop.JPG
DSC_5459 Ascus with spores at 400x in NH4OH (2 drops), phloxine (1 drop) and congo red (1 drop.JPG

Proposed Names

63% (2)
Used references: Boehm, E. W. A., Mugambi, G. K., Miller, A. N., Huhndorf, S. M., Marincowitz, S., Spatafora, J. W., & Schoch, C. L. (2009). A molecular phylogenetic reappraisal of the Hysteriaceae, Mytilinidiaceae and Gloniaceae (Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetes) with keys to world species. Studies in Mycology, 64, 49-83.
Thambugala, K. M., Hyde, K. D., Eungwanichayapant, P. D., Romero, A. I., & Liu, Z. Y. (2016). Additions to the genus Rhytidhysteron in Hysteriaceae. Cryptogamie, Mycologie.
Murillo, C., Albertazzi, F. J., Carranza, J., Lumbsch, H. T., & Tamayo, G. (2009). Molecular data indicate that Rhytidhysteron rufulum (ascomycetes, Patellariales) in Costa Rica consists of four distinct lineages corroborated by morphological and chemical characters. mycological research, 113(4), 405-416.
Soto-Medina, E., & Lücking, R. (2017). A new species of Rhytidhysteron (Ascomycota: Patellariaceae) from Colombia, with a provisional working key to known species in the world. Revista de la Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, 41(158), 59-63.
Based on microscopic features
28% (2)
Recognized by sight

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Comments

Add Comment
Thanks for the link Danny
By: Django Grootmyers (heelsplitter)
2018-11-20 19:55:58 EST (-0500)

I just tried that key out and this keyed out to R. rufulum again. The authors suggest that Clade III from the Costa Rican paper probably represents R. rufulum sensu stricto, which seems to be the closest one to the morphological species concept of R. rufulum anyway.

here’s a newer, bigger key
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2018-11-20 19:29:28 EST (-0500)
Django
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2018-11-20 15:52:13 EST (-0500)

check the Costa Rica paper. Four lineages found among material all previously considered to belong to R. rufulum, with corresponding morphological and metabolic/chemical differences. I see no reason to believe that such diversity is isolated to a single Central American country.

I’m aware
By: Django Grootmyers (heelsplitter)
2018-11-20 15:19:06 EST (-0500)

I keyed this out in the paper on Thai Rhytidhysteron and it still fits R. rufulum best. The combination of red fertile surface, striate ascocarp margin, spore size and spores with 3 transverse septa and no longitudinal septa still seems to be unique to R. rufulum sensu stricto.

this genus
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2018-11-20 15:13:27 EST (-0500)

is much more diverse/complicated than previously thought:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mycres.2008.09.003
https://doi.org/10.7872/crym/v37.iss1.2016.99

and also apparently has the ability to be human pathogenic in immunocompromised persons:

https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.12529

Still not sure
By: Django Grootmyers (heelsplitter)
2018-11-20 14:57:25 EST (-0500)

Apparently Eutryblidiella hysterina is actually a Rhytidhysteron though (see the above paper). R. hysterinum is only known from Europe and has 1-septate spores. R. rufulum is cosmopolitan and has 3-septate spores. R. opuntiae is the only other species known from North America and has spores with 3 transverse septa and 1 or 2 longitudinal septa.

Not really sure
By: Django Grootmyers (heelsplitter)
2016-05-16 00:25:00 EDT (-0400)

Björn Wergen identified this as Eutryblidiella hysterina in Ascomycetes of the World. Roger Melo said to check the spores to confirm later, but I’m not sure what I’d be looking for.

wondering
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2016-05-14 18:05:25 EDT (-0400)

what separates Eutryblideiella from Rhytidhysteron, as the latter was just proposed as an ID by AscoFrance members for some very similar-looking South American discomycetes.