Images

Proposed Names

29% (1)
Recognized by sight
29% (1)
Used references: tentative ID by Jim Bennett
Based on microscopic features: UV+dull y
57% (1)
Recognized by sight: also has similarly looking Ropalospora viridis on some of the photos
Used references: ID provided by Jason Hollinger
Based on microscopic features: K- C+r KC+r P~o weak UV- 350-375nm.

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

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Assuming this is all dry…
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2017-10-31 20:30:03 PDT (-0700)

I would say that photos 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 are Ropalospora viridis, and the rest (1, 5, 6) are Biatora printzenii.

By: Andrew Khitsun (Andrew)
2017-10-31 20:12:01 PDT (-0700)
Which one is Biatora printzenii?
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2017-03-19 14:45:21 PDT (-0700)

I think photos 1, 5 and 6 — the brightest ones with most discrete soralia — are most likely to correspond to the speciumen which was C+r and P+o (gyrophoric acid and pannarin).

But as you can see, these things are variable and subtle at the best of times

Might be best to leave them together and say: both Biatora printzenii and Ropalospora viridis were found in the material collected on this tree.

Yeah, there is a bevy of things here,
By: Andrew Khitsun (Andrew)
2016-11-15 20:09:02 PST (-0800)

I can see Lecanora thysanophora in the third photo too.

There may be photos of two or three different species here
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2016-11-15 04:09:51 PST (-0800)

Some other options (consistent with the UV+ dull yellow) are Biatora chrysantha, B. pontica and B. printzenii. The first and last in particular can look quite yellow, especially when damp.

Jim Bennett thinks it’s Chrysothrix, like C.flavovirens or similar
By: Andrew Khitsun (Andrew)
2016-11-14 18:55:28 PST (-0800)
Sorediate Pertusaria?
By: J-Dar
2016-05-26 06:58:48 PDT (-0700)

Probably a long shot…