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Shannon
By: Parker V
2016-08-03 20:09:18 CDT (-0400)

would you mind uploading a photo of the habitat?

The habitat of each species according to http://www.mycologia.org/content/106/2/282.full

Microglossum griseoviride – “Habitat: On the ground in forests (not among liverworts), on margins of old forest roads, on neutral or only slightly acidic soil under Quercus sp. and Fagus sylvatica.”

Microglossum viride – “Habitat: On the ground in shady humid forests, on wet old forest roads, on the bank of small springs in among liverworts (Pellia epiphylla), or in wet meadows near forest, on slightly acidic to acidic stands under Alnus sp., Populus tremula, Picea abies.”

They mention that acidity may not have much of a impact. The difference being .7(ish) for collected specimens.

The macroscopic differences in their picture are fairly obvious though – the top two are their species concept of M. viride and the bottom are M. griseoviride.

http://www.mycologia.org/content/106/2/282/F5.large.jpg

Not sure what to think. If the picture is a accurate representation of the two different species then everything we “typically” call M. viride is actually M. griseoviride – or they need micro.

It was in moss by a creek
By: Shannon Adams (Sulcatus)
2016-08-03 16:11:40 CDT (-0400)

I collected it. I have a really bad photo of the spot

Habitat
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2016-08-03 15:55:56 CDT (-0400)

is unknown. It was on a foray table. The moss at the base looks like sphagnum. It was labelled M.viride and I don’t think it was scoped. Conditions were hot and very dry. M. griseoviride sounds reasonable but I am not aware of studies of North American species.

Have
By: Parker V
2016-08-03 14:25:46 CDT (-0400)

you read this?

http://www.mycologia.org/content/106/2/282.full

Picture
http://www.mycologia.org/content/106/2/282/F5.expansion.html

What was the habitat? I know you’re not big on micro.

Their picture and data suggests that much of what we call M. viride is actually M. griseoviride?