Observation 275171: Geastrum Pers.

Notes:
Seval clusters covered with fallen forest debris. Eucalyptus rain forest.
Have returned to site of find and taken further images fyi & Identification.

Images

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Image added for John Steinke (John Steinke) Two unopened fruiting bodies.
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Attention Debbie & Danny. Additional images loaded and References used.
Debbie , can you please comment on the N Brougher & Katrina Symes notes for a final naming. The name Geastrum velutinum is used for the group Holobasidiomycetes. Many thanks, kk
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Attention Debbie & Danny. Additional images loaded and References used.
Debbie , can you please comment on the N Brougher & Katrina Symes notes for a final naming. Many thanks, kk
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Attention Debbie & Danny. Additional images loaded and References used.
Debbie , can you please comment on the N Brougher & Katrina Symes notes for a final naming. Many thanks, kk

Proposed Names

-14% (2)
Recognized by sight
64% (3)
Recognized by sight
62% (3)
Recognized by sight
47% (2)
Used references: Australian Field Guide & Tasmnian Field Guide + Fungi of Southern Australia (Neale L. Brougher & Katrina Syme) P116 see notes 1st column ref to Australian Geastrum triplex.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

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could this be a mixed collection?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2017-05-22 08:28:40 PDT (-0700)

your second photo shows what appears to be three layers of peridium, but the other photos do not. Without a triple peridium, it can’t be triplex!

that leaves us back at Geastrum, and maybe still G. javanicum/velutinum (IF does NOT list these two names as synonyms, altho Boughner does), for the majority of images.

the exoperidium (outer layer of earthstar) in your unopened examples shows a reddish brown, matted tomentose skin, at least to my eye.

No slam dunk ID here tho; could be something else entirely. Ain’t taxonomy fun? ;)

Oy! They don’t make them easy.
By: Bob Chapman (Disciseda)
2017-05-21 18:21:45 PDT (-0700)

I don’t see the exterior of the exoperidium being at all tomentose, BUT, Lloyd says that a low power lens was needed to observe this character in American specimens he looked at. Samoan material he found to be “densely tomentose”. Images in The Geastrae pp. 33-35

In The Gastromycetes of Australasia, Cunningham describes G. velutinum as having an exterior “free from debris, covered with a close brown, felted tomentum”.

As Debbie suggests, use a hand lens.

I’ve never seen a ‘velutinum’ outside of books, so can’t really be of help. The two taxa appear (unless an obvious tomentum is present) to be very similar. If I was forced to decide between velutinum and triplex, I’d probably just get a cup of coffee.

the features that you show here, Ian
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2017-05-02 09:40:12 PDT (-0700)

are a good match to G. velutinum. If you have a copy of “Larger Fungi of South Australia,” there is a very good description of this species on pgs. 623-4.

Of course, a picture is often worth a thousand words. It’s shame that Noah chose to take down his photo of this species. It would have been nice to be able to photo compare.

Do you have a hand lens, Ian? That can be very useful to see details that our eyes might miss. I can see matted hairs on the exterior of your earth star egg; your photo alone will not show me the highly discrete tomentose nature of that inner ball.

But all other features appear to match. One could even check spores to eliminate some other local earth stars, but I think your excellent and thorough macro is enough here.

John Steinke (John Steinke)

Image added . Last image.

Nice shots!
By: John Steinke (John Steinke)
2017-05-01 04:59:28 PDT (-0700)
As shot from the bottom would have been helpful.

Maybe G. velutinum?

looks like
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2017-04-30 21:16:13 PDT (-0700)

it’s plenty present then, but I don’t know puffballs well enough to ID many to species. Disciseda would probably be much more helpful here.

Danny

Would you mind having a look at this link please for me and comment. Appreciated kk
Geastrum triplex Jungh. – Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne
data.rbg.vic.gov.au/cat/fungicatalogue/name/7755
Geastrum triplex Jungh., Tydschr. Nat. Gesch. Physiol. 7: 287 (1840). as Geaster. Synonyms (4). Geastrum archeri Berk. (1859) · Geastrum dubium Berk. (1877).
Also several other links seem to be referenced…..?? Just asking please??

i think
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2017-04-30 15:44:27 PDT (-0700)

that by capitalizing the species epithet (‘triplex’) you inadvertently entered a new genus Geastrum with author Triplex. species names should never be capitalized. I agree that this is a Geastrum, but G. triplex may or may not be present in Australasia, and any species ID probably requires someone specifically familiar with gasteromycetes from this part of the world.

Danny

What is the name that should be used please.. “Deprecated”?

Danny

Thanks Danny. I took the name from a field guide. Didnt realise Triplex was the author. Day of learning. Thanks. Did re-read and says Author… ho-hum.

Created: 2017-04-30 04:00:58 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2017-05-22 18:21:23 PDT (-0700)
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