Notes:
Collected at PNW Key Council spring foray, 2017
Single to gregarious in soil under shrubs – rose, dogwood etc. near Quercus, Pseudotsuga, + unidentified smaller hardwood
Cap – < 3.7 cm diam., sub-acute conical; hygrophanous; reddish-ochre at first, drying to ochraceous-buff; smooth, lubricous,
Gills – deeply notched but attached; close; pale orange-ochre, sub-serrate edges;
Stipe – < 10.0 cm tall x 0.8 cm wide; dry; striate to grooved; no annulus; deeply rooting.
Micro – spores ~ 5-7 × 3-3.5, oblong, white, smooth, inamyloid

Species Lists

Images

Proposed Names

45% (2)
Recognized by sight: Web research after name was suggested as possiblility.
Based on microscopic features

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
spores
By: Patrick R. Leacock (MycoGuide)
2018-05-08 01:48:00 EDT (-0400)

The spores are supposed to be amyloid. A weak reaction may be shown in your photo.

those caps do appear to be brick red
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2017-05-31 10:35:30 EDT (-0400)

but seem to fade over time, like many colored fungi.

not all examples are “picture perfect,” eh?

we’ll see how well our macro/micro ID matches up to the DNA.

Thanks for the references…
By: Drew Parker (mycotrope)
2017-05-31 02:01:38 EDT (-0400)

We plan to have this sequenced, so something to look forward to.

Brick red
By: Darvin DeShazer (darv)
2017-05-31 01:11:28 EDT (-0400)

Cap color is described as brick red for Caulorhiza hygrophoroides
Photos:

Steve Nelsen. THE FALSE WITCHʼS CAP AN UNUSUAL FUNGUS FROM NORTH AMERICA. Field Mycology Volume 6(4), October 2005

Also Mycophile 46(4): 19

great find!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2017-05-30 21:20:44 EDT (-0400)

most of the known obsies of this sp. have been from Quebec, in disturbed forest.
One prior known specimen came from OR.

From the IUCN Global Redlist webpage, http://iucn.ekoo.se/iucn/species_view/106561:

“Caulorhiza hygrophoroides is wood-decaying fungus easily identified because of its deep brick-red cap and its longitudinally striate, twisted, solid and tough stem that is strongly rooting”

Created: 2017-05-30 01:42:51 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2019-04-02 15:17:46 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 261 times, last viewed: 2019-12-07 18:46:03 EST (-0500)
Show Log