Notes:
A single immature but very robust fruiting body growing in mixed deciduous woods intermixed with a few hemlocks. The fb was 4.5" long when found. The cap was yellow-brown on the disk, yellow mid-way between cap center and edge and whitish on the margin. The long tubular volval sack was very impressive. The mushroom attempted to expand the cap and elongate the stipe, but I had to though it into the drier as it was getting very soft (the beginning stage of decomposition).
This material has been preserved for RET.

Images

Photographed at the time of collection
Photographed at the time of collection
Photographed 3 hours post collection
Photographed 3 hours post collection
Photographed 3 hours post collection

Proposed Names

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Comments

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Clearly there was a mix-up somewhere. I’m pretty sure you sent me an amanita.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-12-11 07:54:54 CST (-0600)

People have sent me Cortinarii and various Boletales in the past, but I usually catch those because the collector has put a label on them and shipped them by accident. :)

We’ll see what we can learn about the present case. If anything.

At least we can try a do over with a new sample.

Very best,

Rod

Hello, Rod
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2018-12-10 18:51:21 CST (-0600)

How is this even possible if an amanita got sampled? I would accept a mold contamination that overwhelms the target signal, but a Boletales sp.? Did I send you the wrong mushroom? I doubt so.

Unfortunately the DNA is from the Boletales (apparently), but without a good match…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-12-10 18:24:41 CST (-0600)

to anything.

I conclude that we are dealing some sort of contamination. We could resample and try again.

I’m very sorry.

Rod

Thanks for the update, Rod
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2018-05-18 14:35:07 CDT (-0500)

I am very curious, too. Well, I give it 50/50 to be A. williamsiae after having found yet another example of the true (?) williamsiae in the Pine Barrens later in 2017, obs 289538. The apparent difference in cap color and color gradient present in 281666, the habitat/geology and the degree of stipe insertion into the substrate perhaps point to a different species for 281666. However, given how little we know about williamsiae at this time, one can argue that none of this empirical evidence is conclusive. Let’s wait for the molecules to tell the story! :-)

Sampled for DNA sequencing today.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2018-05-18 13:55:30 CDT (-0500)

We’ll see if it turns out to be williamsiae (nom. prov.)

Thanks.

Very best,

Rod

Herbarium Rooseveltensis Amanitarum (R. E. Tulloss) has received specimen.
By: mcmacher
2017-07-18 12:09:43 CDT (-0500)

We have received the dried specimen. Thank you. It is being accessioned in Rod’s herbarium.

Thank you, Rod
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2017-07-13 10:43:38 CDT (-0500)

I agree that williamsiae is a possibility. Compare this observation with obs 102465 from the NJ Pine Barrens that could very well be williamsiae.
Interestingly, the stipe of this collection (281666) was not deeply buried in the ground (~1"), as evidenced by the dirt clinging only to the bottom section of the sack. Also note that the cap color changed post collection toward more brown, as can be inferred from the pix. I’ve seen this happen with another yellow-capped amanita, obs 244455, which is obviously a different species.

I never saw a button of williamsiae, but from your description…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2017-07-13 09:29:28 CDT (-0500)

of its robustness, this is more likely to be williamsiae than the other southern taxa.

The heat has been terrible for the Vaginatae.

Very best,

Rod

Beautiful.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2017-07-13 09:26:18 CDT (-0500)

High priority item. The only yellow species of the Vaginatae I know from NJ is A. williamsiae which is impressively large and in the provisional series Penetratrices. There is a tint to the color in the cap here that suggests species from the deep south such as A.sp-T06” from eastern Texas. It will be very interesting to learn more about this species.

Very best,

Rod

Created: 2017-07-10 21:59:26 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2018-12-11 07:54:55 CST (-0600)
Viewed: 110 times, last viewed: 2019-08-20 15:19:28 CDT (-0500)
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